Summer Creative Writing Workshops

Our creative writing classes will be offered online this summer.
Meeting times will be worked out among the instructors and students. Join us!


Our unique three-week program offers aspiring, practicing, and experienced creative writers a community in which to create and connect.

July 6 - 24, 2020

Program Overview

Classes meet five days a week, mornings and/or afternoons for three weeks during Session F (July 6-24, 2020; first half of Session D). Enrollment open.

You can take one or two daily creative writing classes in short fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and drama. You also have the opportunity to participate in a twice-weekly workshop that teaches you to present your work and listen and critique the creative writing of others. And, most of all, you will meet and socialize with like-mided creative writers and faculty.

Berkeley Students: Two 3-week creative writing courses count as one course for the Creative Writing Minor.

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Courses

The following four classes meet Monday through Friday and are worth 2 units.

ColWrit N131, The Craft of Creative Nonfiction

This course in creative writing focuses on the craft of reading and writing creative nonfiction. The course emphasizes an introduction to craft—how creative nonfiction is generated, what its elements are, and how finished pieces work—which students will explore through careful study of models by published writers, and through writing and revising their own short pieces.

ColWrit N132, The Craft of Short Fiction (two sections available)

This two-unit creative writing course on the short story emphasizes an introduction to craft—how short stories are created, what their elements are, and how the finished pieces work—which you will explore through careful study of models by published writers and through writing and revising your own original pieces generated for this class.

ColWrit N133, The Craft of Dramatic Writing

College Writing N133 is a creative writing course offering an introduction to the craft of dramatic writing through the study of works by professional playwrights and through composition and revision of your own playscripts. You will come to understand dramatic writing as an art and as a set of skills; you will receive an introduction to some of the elements involved in the creation of written scripts. Particular emphasis will be given to the work of generating and revising writing and, to a lesser degree, for the screen.

ColWrit 134, The Craft of Poetry

This two-unit creative writing course on poetry & poetics emphasizes an introduction to craft—how poems are created, what their elements are, and how the finished pieces work—which you will explore through careful study of models by published writers, and through writing and revising your own original pieces generated for this class.

ColWrit 135 The Craft of Creative Writing: Workshopping & Performance*

This is a practical and personalized class that will help writers workshop and perform their creative work. Open to multiple genres--fiction, nonfiction, drama, poetry--we will discuss how to ask good questions to and integrate feedback from peers in workshop. We will help you revisit your work and produce a sustainable revision process for yourself. We will discuss how to select your work for public reading and presentation, and we will practice effective performance strategies. Above all, the class will be tailored to support your goals through individual consultation with the instructor.

*Note: ColWrit 135 is worth 1 unit. 

 

Faculty

Our faculty are experienced instructors of creative writing as well as published authors. For summer 2020, our faculty are

Belinda Kremer, MFA, The Craft of Poetry and The Craft of Short Fiction (Section 2)

Belinda Kremer is a poet who has since 2005 served as the poetry editor of Confrontation: The Literary Magazine, which has published continuously since its inception in 1968. Her work has been published in literary magazines such as Calyx and FENCE, and in her full-length book DECOHERENCE: Poems.

 

Mike Larkin, MFA, The Craft of Short Fiction (Section 1)

Michael Larkin's fiction and essays are forthcoming or have appeared in Harvard Review, The Missouri Review, Arroyo Literary Review, and Writing on the Edge, among others. His work has also been nominated for Pushcart Prizes and featured as "Notable" in The Best American Nonrequired Reading series.

 

John Levine, MFA, The Craft of Dramatic Writing

John Levine’s plays have been workshopped and produced throughout the U.S.—from California to New York, from Texas to Alaska. International productions include Canada, Mexico, India, Australia, the Philippines and the U.K. His work has also been published in a number of anthologies.

 

Michelle Baptiste, MA, The Craft of Creative Nonfiction

Michelle Baptiste, an applied linguist with a background in ethnography and qualitative research, weaves creative nonfiction into her research writing on US naturalization interviews and teacher education on the Navajo Nation--among other current topics. Some of her work has been published by Cambridge University Press & Multilingual Matters.

 

Joseph Horton, MFA,  The Craft of Creative Writing: Workshopping & Performancce

Joe Horton has an MFA from the University of Michigan. He has written for Ploughshares, and is Playwright in Residence for the Savio(u)r Theatre Company in London, England. During the academic year, he teaches at both UC Davis and UC Berkeley.