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CW R4A - Reading and Composition

Fall 2022
Description 

This writing seminar satisfies the first half (Part A) of the Reading & Composition Requirement. It offers students structured, sustained, and highly articulated practice in the recursive processes entailed in reading and composing, as well as critical analysis. Students read five thematically related book-length texts, or the equivalent, drawn from a range of genres, in addition to non-print sources. Themes and texts chosen for each section are comparable in complexity to those encountered in the lower-division curriculum. In response to these materials, students craft several short pieces leading up to three longer essays—works of exposition and/or argumentation. Each essay is crafted as a multi-draft project, and students are guided through the process of revising and refining their writing. Students will write a minimum of 32 pages of expository prose during this semester.

Available in 
Fall, Spring, Summer
Prerequisites 
Satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement
Units and Format 
4 units - Three hours of seminar/discussion per week
Grading Option 
Must be taken for a letter grade for R&C credit

Section

Theme

Time

Instructor

Class Number: 23859
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 3:00pm - 4:00pm @ Dwinelle 189
Section Theme: TBA
Instructor: Donnett Flash
Section Description:
Book List:
Class Number: 23860
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 9:00am - 10:00am @ Dwinelle 89
Section Theme: The Power of Writing
Instructor: Michelle Baptiste
Section Description:

In this reading and writing course, you will embark on a dynamic  journey as you engage with written, visual, and audiovisual texts, generating inquiry questions as you move through the interactive discovery process and toward the iterative composition process.  You will write a narrative about a time you engaged in a discovery process.  You will read about the role of writing at the university across the decades, as our course coincides with the 30th anniversary of UC Berkeley's College Writing Programs.  And you will read about those who sought--mostly with success--to twist the requirements for entry into other universities in Korn & Levitz's 2020 book Unacceptable.   You will read about how universities--and those who work and study within them--frame writing. In an argumentative synthesis essay, you'll reflect on the purposes of education -- and writing.  Out of this rich exploration, you will create your own final projects collaboratively within a wide range of options, including working with the extensive collection of Berkeley Writers at Work interview videos, conducting your own interviews or oral histories, analyzing the recent banning of books by school boards, observing trends in the On the Same Page common reading selections across the past decade, and crafting an interactive timeline & object museum illustrating evolutions in the teaching of writing.

Book List:

Korn, Melissa & Levitz, Jennifer.  (2020).  Unacceptable: Privilege, Deceit & the Making of the College Admissions Scandal. New York: Penguin Random House. (available in hard cover)

Other assorted essays and articles by Paolo Freire, Adrienne Rich, Nancy Sommers, and others. (available on the bCourses course website)

Other texts TBD

Class Number: 24550
Meeting time @ place:
TUTH 11:00am - 12:30pm @ Dwinelle 134
Section Theme: What's gender all about, anyway?
Instructor: Kaya Oakes
Section Description:

Intersectional feminism is an idea that's decades old, but not everyone knows what it really looks like in action. Although our understandings of gender have evolved in terms of biology, psychology and sociology from binary and static to fluid and evolving, sometimes we still talk about gender and how it impacts us in oversimplified ways. In this section of College Writing R4A, we'll explore how gender and identity intersect and impact all aspects of our lives through the lens of reading and writing about those intersections. You'll learn how to do focused textual analysis, how to develop and write arguments, and how to integrate field research and interviewing into your essays. 

Texts (book list TBA, but we'll likely read excerpts from the following)

Judith Butler, Gender Trouble

Angela Davis, Women, Race and Class

bell hooks, Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center

Gloria Anzaldua, Borderlands/La Frontera

Robin Zheng, Why Yellow Fever Isn't Flattering

Janet Mock, Redefining Realness

Alok Vaid-Menon, Beyond the Gender Binary

Plus podcasts, videos, and more

Book List:
Class Number: 26711
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 11:00am - 12:00pm @ Mulford 230
Section Theme: TBA
Instructor: Donnett Flash
Section Description:
Book List:
Class Number: 32187
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 10:00am - 11:00am @ Social Science 115
Section Theme: The Power of Writing
Instructor: Michelle Baptiste
Section Description:

In this reading and writing course, you will embark on a dynamic  journey as you engage with written, visual, and audiovisual texts, generating inquiry questions as you move through the interactive discovery process and toward the iterative composition process.  You will write a narrative about a time you engaged in a discovery process.  You will read about the role of writing at the university across the decades, as our course coincides with the 30th anniversary of UC Berkeley's College Writing Programs.  And you will read about those who sought--mostly with success--to twist the requirements for entry into other universities in Korn & Levitz's 2020 book Unacceptable.   You will read about how universities--and those who work and study within them--frame writing. In an argumentative synthesis essay, you'll reflect on the purposes of education -- and writing.  Out of this rich exploration, you will create your own final projects collaboratively within a wide range of options, including working with the extensive collection of Berkeley Writers at Work interview videos, conducting your own interviews or oral histories, analyzing the recent banning of books by school boards, observing trends in the On the Same Page common reading selections across the past decade, and crafting an interactive timeline & object museum illustrating evolutions in the teaching of writing.

Book List:

Korn, Melissa & Levitz, Jennifer.  (2020).  Unacceptable: Privilege, Deceit & the Making of the College Admissions Scandal. New York: Penguin Random House. (available in hard cover)

Other assorted essays and articles by Paolo Freire, Adrienne Rich, Nancy Sommers, and others. (available on the bCourses course website)

Other texts TBD

 

Class Number: 32188
Meeting time @ place:
TUTH 2:00pm - 3:30pm @ Dwinelle 262
Section Theme: San Francisco History and Culture
Instructor: Ben Spanbock
Section Description:

 Streetopia

(Art by Xara Thustra for Streetopia 2012)

This course introduces university level reading and writing skills to students through content and discussions related to San Francisco. In doing so, the primary objective will be to examine how writers in different disciplines have made sense of the diverse social, cultural, environmental, economic, and regional landscapes of the city, both historically and in contemporary contexts, and then determine how to respond to varied ideas and issues moving forward. This course is predicated on the idea that, as scholars, we will work to explore, understand, and form opinions on difficult problems that are important to society. Working in and with a variety of genres, modes, and styles, we will read and think deeply and carefully, asking questions and developing answers, while practicing both formal and informal writing through sustained engagement with the revision process.

 

Book List:

KCET. City Rising

Wiener, Anna. Uncanny Valley: A Memoir

Yu, Charles. Interior Chinatown

Various Authors. Streetopia

Various Authors. West of the West: Imagining California

Class Number: 32189
Meeting time @ place:
TUTH 9:30am - 11:00am @ Dwinelle 204
Section Theme: San Francisco History and Culture
Instructor: Ben Spanbock
Section Description:

 Streetopia

(Art by Xara Thustra for Streetopia 2012)

This course introduces university level reading and writing skills to students through content and discussions related to San Francisco. In doing so, the primary objective will be to examine how writers in different disciplines have made sense of the diverse social, cultural, environmental, economic, and regional landscapes of the city, both historically and in contemporary contexts, and then determine how to respond to varied ideas and issues moving forward. This course is predicated on the idea that, as scholars, we will work to explore, understand, and form opinions on difficult problems that are important to society. Working in and with a variety of genres, modes, and styles, we will read and think deeply and carefully, asking questions and developing answers, while practicing both formal and informal writing through sustained engagement with the revision process.

 

Book List:

KCET. City Rising

Wiener, Anna. Uncanny Valley: A Memoir

Yu, Charles. Interior Chinatown

Various Authors. Streetopia

Various Authors. West of the West: Imagining California

Class Number: 32190
Meeting time @ place:
TUTH 4:00pm - 5:30pm @ Internet
Section Theme: Responding to Eco Apocalypse
Instructor: Mary Grover
Section Description:

This 4-unit writing and reading seminar fulfills the first half of the Reading and Composition requirement for students who have already met the Entry Level Writing Requirement and must be taken for a letter grade.  Expect to spend 15+ hours per week on reading & writing assignments.  

We are now experiencing what some might call harbingers of eco-apocalypse: rampant wildfires, hurricane proliferation, crop-annihilating drought and floods, famine.  Meanwhile, political, scientific and social communities struggle to respond productively, even while vulnerable peoples suffer the brunt of climate change and its ecological fallout.  What are the consequences of environmental depredation? What are the causes? What should or can we do? In this course, we will make sense of our predicament, discussing and analyzing fiction and non-fiction texts, including documentaries.  

Book List:

This Changes Everything (non fiction) by Naomi Klein

The Future We Choose (non fiction) by Christiana Figueres and Tom Rivett Carnac

The Parable of the Sower by Octavia E. Butler