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CW R4A - Reading and Composition

Fall 2021
Description 

This writing seminar satisfies the first half (Part A) of the Reading & Composition Requirement. It offers students structured, sustained, and highly articulated practice in the recursive processes entailed in reading and composing, as well as critical analysis. Students read five thematically related book-length texts, or the equivalent, drawn from a range of genres, in addition to non-print sources. Themes and texts chosen for each section are comparable in complexity to those encountered in the lower-division curriculum. In response to these materials, students craft several short pieces leading up to three longer essays—works of exposition and/or argumentation. Each essay is crafted as a multi-draft project, and students are guided through the process of revising and refining their writing. Students will write a minimum of 32 pages of expository prose during this semester.

 

Available in 
Fall, Spring, Summer
Prerequisites 
Satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement
Units and Format 
4 units - Three hours of seminar/discussion per week
Grading Option 
Must be taken for a letter grade for R&C credit

Section

Theme

Time

Instructor

Class Number: 24466
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 3:00pm - 4:00pm @ Wheeler 104
Section Theme: Language & Power in Action
Instructor: Michelle Baptiste
Section Description:

In this course we will examine how language use—from dialect to metaphor—reflects citizenship status, race, culture, law, ethnicity, indigeneity, and identity in media, politics, medicine, education, and individuals’ lives. We will discuss and analyze both spoken and written language, fiction and non-fiction, alphabetic texts and (audio)visual texts. You will begin by using others' stories to reflect on your own language experience--and then broaden out into reflecting on immigrant portrayals -- from metaphor to written portrait, ultimately closing the course by closely investigating a primary source of your choice. Expect to delve deeply into the texts—reading and rereading, viewing and reviewing while extensively revising as you publish in diverse genres and on various platforms.

Why does the language we speak matter? How does accent affect perception? How does metaphor usage impact worldview? Why is discrimination based on language often upheld by the courts? When, where, and why do language and power intersect?  How relevant is storytelling in our modern world? How can we interrupt prejudice surrounding language?  

 

Book List:

Lippi-Green, Rosina.  (1997).  English with an accent: Language, ideology, and discrimination in the United States.  London: Routledge.  E-book available through UCB Library

Santa Ana, Otto.  (2002).  Brown tide rising: Metaphors of Latinos in contemporary American public discourse.  Austin: University of Texas Press. E-book available through UCB Library

Karla Cornejo Villavicencio's On the Same Page The Undocumented Americans. E-book by email link sent to all incoming UC Berkeley students

Writing for Success (a free open source writer's reference resource)

+ Various diverse texts as pdfs and links on bCourses, including short stories and narrative essays

 

Class Number: 24467
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 9:00am - 10:00am @ Evans 72
Section Theme: TBA
Instructor: Donnett Flash
Section Description:
Book List:
Class Number: 25405
Meeting time @ place:
TUTH 11:00am - 12:30pm @ Evans 35
Section Theme: Beautiful Liars: Belief and the Complexity of Deception
Instructor: Ryan Sloan
Section Description:

Nothing fools you better than the lie you tell yourself -- Teller

Come behind the curtain. We'll examine why every culture believes in magic; weigh how modern illusionists and con men fool their willing audiences, often with an understanding of neuroscience; explore the complexity of deceiving others and oneself in the pursuit of truth; examine the economics and psychology of fraudulent long cons; and explore the rich thrill of rituals and belief through interviews & personal essay.

Along the way, you'll become a stronger writer, reader & thinker, creating a range of expository and analytical essays while engaging with texts and films you won't soon forget.

Book List:

Books: The Honest Truth About Dishonesty (Ariely); They Say / I Say (Graff/Birkenstein); Digital course reader [free, on bCourses]. 

Films: An Honest Liar; The Inventor: Out for Blood in Silicon Valley

Class Number: 33693
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 12:00pm - 1:00pm @ Social Science 180
Section Theme: Language & Power in Action
Instructor: Michelle Baptiste
Section Description:

In this course we will examine how language use—from dialect to metaphor—reflects citizenship status, race, culture, law, ethnicity, indigeneity, and identity in media, politics, medicine, education, and individuals’ lives. We will discuss and analyze both spoken and written language, fiction and non-fiction, alphabetic texts and (audio)visual texts. You will begin by using others' stories to reflect on your own language experience--and then broaden out into reflecting on immigrant portrayals -- from metaphor to written portrait, ultimately closing the course by closely investigating a primary source of your choice. Expect to delve deeply into the texts—reading and rereading, viewing and reviewing while extensively revising as you publish in diverse genres and on various platforms.

Why does the language we speak matter? How does accent affect perception? How relevant is storytelling in our modern world? How does metaphor impact worldview? Why is linguistic discrimination often upheld by the courts? When, where, and why do language and power intersect?  How can we interrupt prejudice surrounding language?  

 

Book List:

Lippi-Green, Rosina.  (1997).  English with an accent: Language, ideology, and discrimination in the United States.  London: Routledge.  E-book available through UCB Library

Santa Ana, Otto.  (2002).  Brown tide rising: Metaphors of Latinos in contemporary American public discourse.  Austin: University of Texas Press. E-book available through UCB Library

Cornejo Villavicencio, Karla.  (2020).  The Undocumented Americans. E-Reserve available through UCB Library -- UC Berkeley's On the Same Page Read for 2021-2022 with E-book sent by emailed link sent to all incoming UC Berkeley students

Writing for Success (a free open source writer's reference resource)

+ Various diverse texts as pdfs and links on bCourses, including a short story, personal narratives, essays, chapters, and scholarly articles by Anzaldúa & Alexie; Baldwin & Butler; Colombo, Mano, & Lisle; Foreman & Roberts; Sommers & Tan; Murray & Dweck; Lamott & Bishop; Rickford & King