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CW R1A - Accelerated Reading and Composition

Spring 2019
Description 

This intensive, accelerated course satisfies concurrently the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement and the first half (Part A) of the Reading & Composition Requirement. It offers students structured, sustained, and highly articulated practice in the recursive processes entailed in reading, critical analysis, and composing. Readings include imaginative, expository, and argumentative texts comparable in complexity to those encountered in the lower-division curriculum. Texts are chosen to represent views and perspectives of authors from diverse social and cultural backgrounds. Students read five thematically related book-length texts, or the equivalent, drawn from a range of genres, in addition to non-print sources. In response to these materials, they craft numerous short pieces leading up to three to five essays—works that include elements of narration, exposition, and argument. Students write a minimum of 40 pages of prose during this semester and they compose an annotated portfolio that showcases their best work.

Available in 
Spring, Summer, Fall
Prerequisites 
None
Units and Format 
6 units - Six hours of lecture/discussion per week
Grading Option 
Must be taken for a letter grade for R&C credit
Fulfills 
Reading & Composition: 1st half (Part A)
Entry Level Writing

Section

Theme

Time

Instructor

Class Number: 21892
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 8:00am - 10:00am @ 100 Wheeler Hall (ALC)
Section Theme: Gender: Beneath the Surface
Instructor: Caroline M. Cole
Section Description:

We often divide gender into two neat categories—masculine and feminine—and ignore many questions. Is gender constant or fluid? Is it biologically determined, socially constructed, or both? If gender is at least partially constructed, who or what constructs and maintains these categories, and for what reasons? And how do various forums (re)shape our understanding of what it means to be male or female, and with what effect?

Reading materials from the fields of biology, linguistics, media studies, literature, and popular culture, students will have the opportunity to explore some of the ways gender can influence how we see ourselves, others, and our world; however, the primary focus of this course will be identifying, learning about, practicing, and strengthening various reading, writing, and critical thinking strategies.

To help in these efforts, students will complete various sequenced and scaffolded assignments, which may include annotated bibliographies, extended summaries, critiques, juxtaposition, comparison/contrast, problem/solution arguments, visual analysis, and literary analysis. Individually and collectively, these assignments will help students increase their proficiency in the rhetorical strategies valued both at the university and beyond.

Book List:

In addition to a set of readers that will be available at a local copy shop, students will need the following books:

• Gilman, Charlotte Perkins. Herland: A Lost Feminist Utopian Novel (ISBN 0-394-73665-6)

• Gerald Graff & Cathy Birkenstein. "They Say/ I Say": The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing, 3rd edition (ISBN: 978-0393935844)

• Lipson, Charles. Doing Honest Work in College: How to Prepare Citations, Avoid Plagiarism and Achieve Real Academic Success, 2nd Edition (ISBN 978-0226484778)

Students are also encouraged to have a handbook with general information on grammar and punctuation, as well as a dictionary. We will discuss strategies for identifying the best options in class.

Class Number: 21893
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 10:00am - 12:00pm @ 100 Wheeler Hall (ALC)
Section Theme: Family Matters
Instructor: Tara Hottman
Section Description:

To what extent does family identity determine individual identity? How do family identity and national or cultural identity intersect? To what extent is the family unit bound up in questions of politics, economics, the law? What forces hold families together, and what happens when family configurations change in unexpected ways? How would we distinguish the biological family from the adopted family? To what extent do we choose our families, and to what extent do they choose us? How do families tell stories about themselves, and how does the reception and retelling of these stories inform our own sense of self?

This class will turn to texts from a variety of disciplines and genres as we interrogate the notion of the family. Most importantly, we’ll work on developing the critical reading and analytical writing skills that will help us to articulate what happens when we approach texts of all kinds. With our course readings as our common terrain, we’ll learn to read a variety of texts closely and carefully, focusing on strategies for critical reading and re-reading and developing our ability to analyze the relationship between meaning and textual form. 

Book List:
Class Number: 21894
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 10:00am - 12:00pm @ 50 Barrows Hall
Section Theme: The 1950s in Literature, Media, and Film
Instructor: Jonathan Lang
Section Description:

The 1950s is often considered a golden period of American prosperity and peace. In actuality, it was a period of tremendous social and political unrest. Family norms alienated men and women who felt restricted by the roles assigned to husband/wife, father/mother; on the national front, African-Americans fought for basic civil rights; and on the international front, Cold War tensions simmered: Americans became involved in foreign conflicts that left the nation divided. We will focus on understanding the historical character of the 1950s through literature, film, and the non-fictional essay. The course will also review the fundamentals of expository writing, with an emphasis on process and in revision especially.

Book List:

Mechanical Brides (Ellen Lupton); Things They Carried (Tim O'Brien); This Boy’s Life (Tobias Wolff). Film: Far from Heaven (Todd Haynes, dir.)

Class Number: 21895
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 10:00am - 12:00pm @ 134 Dwinelle Hall
Section Theme: The Rhetoric of Science
Instructor: Michal Reznizki
Section Description:

What is Science? How is it being communicated to the public? In this course, we will focus on scientific communication and on how scientific advances are being “translated” to popular audiences. We will read two books about the topic and will explore rhetorical elements of both academic and popular articles on different scientific topics.

Book List:

Bad Advice: Or Why Celebrities, Politicians, and Activists Aren’t Your Best Source of Health Information, by Paul Offit

Houston, We Have a Narrative, by Randy Olson

The Essential Guide to Rhetoric, by Christian Lundberg and William Keith

Class Number: 21896
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 12:00pm - 2:00pm @ 100 Wheeler Hall (ALC)
Section Theme: Music: Culture, Community, and Identity
Instructor: Jordan Ruyle
Section Description:

This course focuses on topics in music, exploring social and cultural roles music plays. You’ll read fiction from James Baldwin, John Darnielle and others as you consider the role of music in our lives. You’ll also explore our physiological and social relationships with music through non-fiction from Oliver Sacks, Joan Morgan, and Daniel Levitin. In addition, you’ll read and respond to academic texts in ethnomusicology that examine the place of music and performance in culture.

Expect to read a lot, write a lot, and revise a lot. While responding critically to these texts and ideas, you’ll strengthen your academic writing. You’ll learn about and practice techniques for developing arguments, crafting essays, revising papers, and proofreading your writing. You will be challenged, but you will also be rewarded by becoming a stronger writer and thinker.

*This is a multi-lingual student writer section.  Thus, this course is reserved for those who self-identify as growing up speaking a language other than or in addition to English.  All the students in the class will be bilingual.

Book List:

Master of Reality, John Darnielle.

Music of Multicultural America, Kip Lornel and Anne K. Rasmussen, eds- DO NOT BUY This book is available as an ebook through the UC Berkeley library's Project Muse.

Other texts will be excerpted in a course reader available after the first day of class.

Class Number: 21897
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 12:00pm - 2:00pm @ 230 Mulford Hall (ALC)
Section Theme: Witness and Testimony
Instructor: Ben Spanbock
Section Description:

Understanding subjectivity is an essential part of the writing process. When we express ourselves, make an argument, or tell a story, we do so from a position shaped by who we are and where we are, our background and experiences, our thoughts and beliefs, and even how we are feeling in that moment. Subjectivity also plays a foundational role in how we understand and interpret others and the world around us. It shapes our opinions and makes us unique. This class asks students to consider subjectivity through two distinct but related paradigms: witnessing, an act of seeing or otherwise experiencing an event, and testimony, an act of self-expression meant to share or convey opinions on what has been witnessed. The purpose of this class is to introduce practical methods for reading “texts” (print, visual, auditory, social, etc.) and to activate both thought and writing processes to engage with the dynamic issues they raise. Together we will examine a number of short and long texts that draw from and speak to discourses from across the academic disciplines and raise questions concerning subjectivity in acts of witness and testimony. Operating under the premise that our community stands to benefit from a diversity of perspectives and opinions, we will explore different techniques for self-expression and different types of writing with a goal of better understanding our own subject positions, as well as those we encounter.

 

Book List:

The Well Crafted Sentence (Nora Bacon); The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (Mark Haddon); Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies (Seth Holmes); Darkroom: A Memoir in Black and White (Lila Quintero Weaver); Course Reader (on bCourses)

Class Number: 21898
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 12:00pm - 2:00pm @ 134 Dwinelle Hall
Section Theme: The Dilemmas that Define Us
Instructor: Sara Hong
Section Description:

This intensive reading and writing course will examine a variety of dilemmas -- ethical, personal, educational -- and write about issues using a diverse array of rhetorical strategies. Through critical reading, analytical writing, and class discussion, we will explore dilemmas that not only affect our society, but ourselves. 

In a world that emphasizes consumption over introspection, we need the reflective exercise of writing more than ever. The activities of thinking, writing, and revising take energy and effort, but they are fundamental to our growth as scholars, citizens, and human beings.  I look forward to working and writing with you next semester!

Book List:

They Say/I Say 2nd Edition. Ed. Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein. W.W. Norton.

Course Reader (purchase through Copy Central, located on Telegraph Ave.)

The Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael Pollan. 

Switch: How to Change Things When Change is Hard. Chip Heath and Dan Heath. Broadway.

Class Number: 21899
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 12:00pm - 2:00pm @ 65 Evans Hall
Section Theme: Answer: "What is the Post-Human?"
Instructor: Belinda Kremer
Section Description:

What is it to be human, and what defines “the human” in 2018?  What is “the post-human,” and how do humanity, “the human,” and ”the “post-human” relate to the bodies—our own and others’—through which we understand and frame the past, engage the present, and look to the future? How are machines, machine-human interfaces, “mind uploading,” artificial intelligences, and our evolving relationships with technology shaping our understanding of what it is to be human, and our experiences of living as humans?

We will explore these and other questions through a weekly podcast that explores our personal and social relationships with technology; documentary films on problems of your choosing; a hybrid memoir/history/critical examination/philosophy that reports in the first person on the lived experience of the black male body; a volume of poems that considers life on Earth from a future perspective; and many other texts from wide ranges of both genre and medium. We will explore intersections among experience, meaning-making, and self; intelligences natural and artificial; the body, speciesism, & the “performance” of being human; and technologies, justice, and social justice. You will compose smaller informal texts and larger formal texts including an exposition, a film analysis, a persuasive text, & a multimedia project, developing a range of rhetorical strategies as you explore deeply the questions of the human. 

Book List:

Texts To Purchase: 

Ta-Nehisi CoatesBetween the World and Me. Spiegel & Grau, 2015.
Hardcover ISBN-13: 978-0812993547  OR   Paperback ISBN-13: 978-1925240702  OR  e-book: Kindle

Tracy K. Smith.  Life on Mars: Poems. Graywolf Press, 2011.     Paperback: ISBN-13: 978-1555975845  OR  e-book: Kindle

 John ChaffeeCritical Thinking, Thoughtful Writing. 6th ed. Cengage Learning, 2015. 
Paperback  ISBN-13: 978-1285443034  OR  e-textbook, Kindle Edition (note: check device compatibility)

Digital Texts: The 2 sites below will be primary to the course, and we will access them at no cost

Note to Self  podcast   http://www.wnyc.org/shows/notetoself

Kanopy  streaming (videos/films)   https://www.kanopy.com

 

Class Number: 21900
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 2:00pm - 4:00pm @ 100 Wheeler Hall (ALC)
Section Theme: Answer: "What is the Post-Human?"
Instructor: Belinda Kremer
Section Description:

What is it to be human, and what defines “the human” in 2018?  What is “the post-human,” and how do humanity, “the human,” and ”the “post-human” relate to the bodies—our own and others’—through which we understand and frame the past, engage the present, and look to the future? How are machines, machine-human interfaces, “mind uploading,” artificial intelligences, and our evolving relationships with technology shaping our understanding of what it is to be human, and our experiences of living as humans?

We will explore these and other questions through a weekly podcast that explores our personal and social relationships with technology; documentary films on problems of your choosing; a hybrid memoir/history/critical examination/philosophy that reports in the first person on the lived experience of the black male body; a volume of poems that considers life on Earth from a future perspective; and many other texts from wide ranges of both genre and medium. We will explore intersections among experience, meaning-making, and self; intelligences natural and artificial; the body, speciesism, & the “performance” of being human; and technologies, justice, and social justice. You will compose smaller informal texts and larger formal texts including an exposition, a film analysis, a persuasive text, & a multimedia project, developing a range of rhetorical strategies as you explore deeply the questions of the human. 

Book List:

Texts To Purchase: 

Ta-Nehisi CoatesBetween the World and Me. Spiegel & Grau, 2015.
Hardcover ISBN-13: 978-0812993547  OR   Paperback ISBN-13: 978-1925240702  OR  e-book: Kindle

Tracy K. Smith.  Life on Mars: Poems. Graywolf Press, 2011.     Paperback: ISBN-13: 978-1555975845  OR  e-book: Kindle

 John ChaffeeCritical Thinking, Thoughtful Writing. 6th ed. Cengage Learning, 2015. 
Paperback  ISBN-13: 978-1285443034  OR  e-textbook, Kindle Edition (note: check device compatibility)

Digital Texts: The 2 sites below will be primary to the course, and we will access them at no cost

Note to Self  podcast   http://www.wnyc.org/shows/notetoself

Kanopy  streaming (videos/films)   https://www.kanopy.com

 

Class Number: 21901
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 2:00pm - 4:00pm @ 122 Barrows Hall (ALC)
Section Theme: Exploring Ethics
Instructor: Donnett Flash
Section Description:
Book List:

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption (Bryan Stevenson)

The Sunflower (Simon Wiesenthal)

They Say/I Say  (Graff, Birkenstein, Durst)

Pages