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CW R1A - Accelerated Reading and Composition

Fall 2022
Description 

This intensive, accelerated course satisfies concurrently the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement and the first half (Part A) of the Reading & Composition Requirement. It offers students structured, sustained, and highly articulated practice in the recursive processes entailed in reading, critical analysis, and composing. Readings include imaginative, expository, and argumentative texts comparable in complexity to those encountered in the lower-division curriculum. Texts are chosen to represent views and perspectives of authors from diverse social and cultural backgrounds. Students read five thematically related book-length texts, or the equivalent, drawn from a range of genres, in addition to non-print sources. In response to these materials, they craft numerous short pieces leading up to three to five essays—works that include elements of narration, exposition, and argument. Students write a minimum of 40 pages of prose during this semester and they compose an annotated portfolio that showcases their best work.

Note: Specialized sections are available for multilingual student writers. These sections are marked (MSW) below.

Available in 
Fall, Spring, and Summer
Prerequisites 
Must not have fulfilled the Entry Level Writing Requirement
Units and Format 
6 units – Six hours of lecture/discussion per week
Grading Option 
Must be taken for a letter grade for R&C credit
Fulfills 
Reading & Composition: 1st half (Part A)
Entry Level Writing

Section

Theme

Time

Instructor

Class Number: 21064
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 8:00am - 10:00am @ Wheeler 100
Section Theme: "All the World's a Stage"
Instructor: Becky Hsu
Section Description:

How do we read? How do we write? How do we think? Becoming a competent reader and writer means turning these actions into a combined practice of reading, writing, and - most important - thinking.

Practice. It’s a word that can conjure up the most “meh” of feelings: obligation, boredom, frustration (maybe even pain). For us, “practice,” more than anything else, will mean respecting writing as a process. Writing to brainstorm. Writing to draft. Writing to revise. Writing to publish. Writing – we hope -- to feel and to think.

This course is 6 units, which means it will cover the workload of 2 separate courses. You will write 3 to 4 essays, including drafts, all of which will culminate in a final portfolio of your most polished pieces.

Putting thoughts of workload aside, I want us to keep a larger goal in mind. This course, beyond all else, will reveal to you that “failure” and “success” are empty terms. Fulfillment will instead derive from viewing writing as “works in progress.”

Furthermore, we will explore this process of writing through our encounters with the course theme, “All the World’s a Stage.” (Give yourself a pat on the back if you know where that line comes from. Hint: Shakespeare.) How do we become ourselves, particularly since we don’t live in a vacuum but a wider world made up of overlapping realities? What are the expectations we live under and how do they mold us? How do we resist those expectations? We will explore these questions through our primary sources.

Book List:

Anna Deavere Smith's Notes from the Field

Charles Yu's Interior Chinatown

I will assign essays and excerpts, which I will provide for free, throughout the semester as well. We will also watch the documentary film version of Notes from the Field and select episodes of the TV show Euphoria (both of which will be provided for free).

Class Number: 21067
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 10:00am - 12:00pm @ Wheeler 100
Section Theme: "All the World's a Stage"
Instructor: Becky Hsu
Section Description:

How do we read? How do we write? How do we think? Becoming a competent reader and writer means turning these actions into a combined practice of reading, writing, and - most important - thinking.

Practice. It’s a word that can conjure up the most “meh” of feelings: obligation, boredom, frustration (maybe even pain). For us, “practice,” more than anything else, will mean respecting writing as a process. Writing to brainstorm. Writing to draft. Writing to revise. Writing to publish. Writing – we hope -- to feel and to think.

This course is 6 units, which means it will cover the workload of 2 separate courses. You will write 3 to 4 essays, including drafts, all of which will culminate in a final portfolio of your most polished pieces.

Putting thoughts of workload aside, I want us to keep a larger goal in mind. This course, beyond all else, will reveal to you that “failure” and “success” are empty terms. Fulfillment will instead derive from viewing writing as “works in progress.”

Furthermore, we will explore this process of writing through our encounters with the course theme, “All the World’s a Stage.” (Give yourself a pat on the back if you know where that line comes from. Hint: Shakespeare.) How do we become ourselves, particularly since we don’t live in a vacuum but a wider world made up of overlapping realities? What are the expectations we live under and how do they mold us? How do we resist those expectations? We will explore these questions through our primary sources.

Book List:

Anna Deavere Smith's Notes from the Field

Charles Yu's Interior Chinatown 

I will assign essays and excerpts, which I will provide for free, throughout the semester as well. We will also watch the documentary film version of Notes from the Field and select episodes of the TV show Euphoria (both of which will be provided for free).

Class Number: 21068
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 10:00am - 12:00pm @ Evans 35
Section Theme: Natural Rights
Instructor: Matthew J. Parker
Section Description:

This class will look at inalienable/natural rights, their evolution through the centuries and the ways in which churches, states, and private entities have tried and are still trying to usurp them. Progress, even in our liberal democracy, is slow and often accompanied by nationalist blowback.  The end of slavery, for instance, led to the black codes, the convict leasing system, the Chinese Exclusion Act, Jim Crow, and the militarization of police to enforce alcohol, drug, and sex worker prohibitions.

The second half of the semester will examine how denial of natural rights exacerbates the biggest threat to our existence, climate change, and how the extension of even a modicum of these liberties, like educating girls worldwide, can help to reverse it.

Book List:

Books:

On Tyranny Graphic Edition: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century

Timothy Snyder

ISBN-10: 1984859153

Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed to Reverse Global Warming. Edited by Paul Hawken

ISBN-10:‎ 9780143130444

Class Number: 21069
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 10:00am - 12:00pm @ Evans 51
Section Theme: Work and Labor
Instructor: Margaret Salifu
Section Description:

A job is a job: Does it matter which one a person does to earn a living? This question and others emerge from conversations as well as texts that we focus on, as we address “Work and Labor” in this course. Our reading and writing activities will help us to investigate work and society nexuses in the US and other parts of the world, exploring workers’ experiences at the workplace, home, and beyond. Four essential points that Toni Morrison raises in her 2017 essay, “The Work You Do, The Person You Are,” in The New Yorker will help us explore workers’ lives and struggles: “1. Whatever the work is, do it well—not for the boss but for yourself. 2. You make the job; it doesn’t make you. 3. Your real life is with us, your family. 4. You are not the work you do; you are the person you are.” 

Book List:

God’s Bits of Wood by Ousmane Sembène; Rivethead by Ben Hamper; A Working Stiff’s Manifesto by Iain Levison

Class Number: 21070
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 10:00am - 12:00pm @ Social Science 78
Section Theme: TBA
Section Description:
Book List:
Class Number: 21081
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 12:00pm - 2:00pm @ Wheeler 100
Section Theme: TBA
Instructor: Scott Wallin
Section Description:
Book List:
Class Number: 21082
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 12:00pm - 2:00pm @ Mulford 107
Section Theme: Tell Me You Don’t Like Writing Without Telling Me You Don’t Like Writing: Questioning The Ways We’ve Been Taught to Write
Section Description:

What are your past experiences with writing in school? How do you feel about writing? Every semester for the past 10 years of teaching writing I have been hearing students lament about and saddened by the ways in which they were taught to write. This semester, we are going to take a closer look at this issue, especially at what has been called by many the “writing crisis.” Our class theme is focused on how writing is being taught in schools in the 21st century. We will be looking at some of the problems with how students in school perceive writing, different writing practices such as the five paragraph essay, as well as issues in the Education system and the solutions to these problems. This course invites you to rethink everything you learned about writing and build writing knowledge that will help you grow and become a better writer.

Book List:

How to Take Smart Notes by Sonke Ahrens

Why They Can't Write: Killing the Five-Paragraph Essay and Other Necessities by John Warner

Class Number: 21072
Meeting time @ place:
MW 3:00pm - 6:00pm @ Social Science 122
Section Theme: Music: Culture, Community, and Identity
Instructor: Jordan Ruyle
Section Description:

The theme of this section of CWR1A is music, an exploration of the social and cultural roles music plays. Our texts include fiction from James Baldwin, Louise Erdrich, and others. You’ll also explore our physiological and social relationships with music through non-fiction from Oliver Sacks and Daniel Levitin. In addition, you’ll read and respond to academic texts in ethnomusicology that examine the place of music and performance in culture. Finally, you’ll create a reflective multimodal essay focusing on your own relationship with music.

Expect to read a lot, write a lot, and revise a lot. While responding critically to these texts and ideas, you’ll strengthen your academic writing. You’ll learn about and practice techniques for developing arguments, crafting essays, revising papers, and proofreading your writing. The course work is challenging, but you will be rewarded by becoming a stronger writer and thinker.

Book List:

A required course reader will be available during the first week of class.

Other texts will be excerpted and available in digital format.

Class Number: 21074
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 10:00am - 12:00pm @ Evans 41
Section Theme: Technology and Human Behavior
Instructor: Joe De Quattro
Section Description:

Every major life changing technology invented since the beginning of time shares something in common: when we're done with it we leave it, or it's turned off. We do not take our combustion engines, our electricity, our fire, with us. This course will focus on the technology age we currently find ourselves in with emphasis on the simple fact that the life/world changing tech we consume every minute of every day (phone) is different from all previous technologies: we take it with us everywhere and feel, what, bereft?, if we forget it or find ourselves without it. The underlying question for the semester will be how this "behavior" (for it is now an engrained behavior in all of us) might be impacting who we are as a people. In addition, we will focus on power systems, too, which are a form of tech as well. Society, for one. Through close readings of essays and fiction, and through class discussion, we will explore the idea of identity, perception, fate and character in the 21st century. In the process we will discuss the increasing need for speed in our every day lives and its advantages and disadvantages.

Book List:

The Stranger by Albert Camus; various readings provided on bCourses

Class Number: 21075
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 12:00pm - 2:00pm @ Dwinelle 263
Section Theme: The Rhetoric of Resistance: Utopian Thought as Process
Instructor: Eric Longfellow
Section Description:

In an interview, historian and scholar Howard Zinn was asked if there have been any moments in world history that he would choose to emulate in thinking about the future of global society. His answer discusses only two examples. The Paris Commune of 1871 and revolutionary Catalonia at the beginning of the Spanish Civil War. In this course, Zinn’s response will serve as a jumping off point to explore literature and writing that engages, simultaneously, with histories of subjugation and more equitable futures. The course will move beyond the examples cited to explore what is at the root of thinking through utopias as a process rather than an end.

Book List:

Excerpts from Communal Luxury by Kristin Ross

Excerpts from On Anarchism by Noam Chomsky

Excerpts from Cruising Utopia by Jose Esteban Munoz

The Female Man by Joanna Russ

Trouble on Triton by Samuel Delany

Pages