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CW R1A - Accelerated Reading and Composition

Fall 2021
Description 

This intensive, accelerated course satisfies concurrently the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement and the first half (Part A) of the Reading & Composition Requirement. It offers students structured, sustained, and highly articulated practice in the recursive processes entailed in reading, critical analysis, and composing. Readings include imaginative, expository, and argumentative texts comparable in complexity to those encountered in the lower-division curriculum. Texts are chosen to represent views and perspectives of authors from diverse social and cultural backgrounds. Students read five thematically related book-length texts, or the equivalent, drawn from a range of genres, in addition to non-print sources. In response to these materials, they craft numerous short pieces leading up to three to five essays—works that include elements of narration, exposition, and argument. Students write a minimum of 40 pages of prose during this semester and they compose an annotated portfolio that showcases their best work.

Note: Specialized sections are available for multilingual student writers. These sections are marked (MSW) below.

Available in 
Fall and Spring
Prerequisites 
Placement by the Analytical Writing Placement Examination
Units and Format 
6 units – Six hours of lecture/discussion per week
Grading Option 
Must be taken for a letter grade for R&C credit
Fulfills 
Reading & Composition: 1st half (Part A)

Section

Theme

Time

Instructor

Class Number: 21259
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 8:00am - 10:00am @ Haviland 321
Section Theme: Natural Rights
Instructor: Matthew J. Parker
Section Description:

This class will look at inalienable/natural rights, their evolution through the centuries and the ways in which churches, states, and private entities have tried and are still trying to usurp them. Progress, even in our liberal democracy, is slow and often accompanied by nationalist blowback.  The end of slavery, for instance, led to the black codes, the convict leasing system, the Chinese Exclusion Act, Jim Crow, and the militarization of police to enforce alcohol, drug, and sex worker prohibitions.

The second half of the semester will examine how denial of natural rights exacerbates the biggest threat to our existence, climate change, and how the extension of even a modicum of these liberties, like educating girls worldwide, can help to reverse it.   

Book List:
Class Number: 21262
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 10:00am - 12:00pm @ Haviland 321
Section Theme: Space and Place
Instructor: Chisako A. Cole
Section Description:

Freedom and security are vulnerable to being compromised by fear and misconceptions. We will explore this conflict by looking at the use of public and private spaces, proximity to others, and proximity to truth. Students will examine a variety of sources, including a historical novel, a nonfiction work, a film, and photography. Writing assignments will include an image analysis, theme analysis, and  an autoethnographic essay.

Book List:
Class Number: 21263
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 10:00am - 12:00pm @ Social Science 50
Section Theme: Community
Section Description:

Welcome to R1A! Our theme for this Fall is Community. Humans are inherently social creatures and with the forced isolation of sheltering-in-place, we could say that fostering community is important now more than ever. Accordingly, in this class we will consider the topic of community from multiple perspectives: their formation and ways to build a strong community, the nature of belonging, the experience of exclusion, as well as migrations' impact on community. This course will pay particular attention to the ways in which marginalized groups build and sustain community while also examining the limits and compromises inherent in public advocacy.

We will read texts of all kinds closely and critically: short stories, nonfiction, film, and a novella. 

Book List:
Class Number: 21264
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 10:00am - 12:00pm @ Dwinelle 189
Section Theme: TBA
Instructor: Donnett Flash
Section Description:
Book List:
Class Number: 21265
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 10:00am - 12:00pm @ Wheeler 100 (ALC)
Section Theme: Music: Culture, Community, and Identity
Instructor: Jordan Ruyle
Section Description:

The theme of this section of CWR1A is music, an exploration of the social and cultural roles music plays. Our texts include fiction from James Baldwin, Louise Erdrich, and others. You’ll also explore our physiological and social relationships with music through non-fiction from Oliver Sacks and Daniel Levitin. In addition, you’ll read and respond to academic texts in ethnomusicology that examine the place of music and performance in culture. Finally, you’ll create a reflective multimodal essay focusing on your own relationship with music.

Expect to read a lot, write a lot, and revise a lot. While responding critically to these texts and ideas, you’ll strengthen your academic writing. You’ll learn about and practice techniques for developing arguments, crafting essays, revising papers, and proofreading your writing. The course work is challenging, but you will be rewarded by becoming a stronger writer and thinker.

*Fall 2021: This section is designated MSW, meaning that it is designed for Multilingual Student Writers. Students from multilingual backgrounds should take this class. This might mean international students or students who grew up in bilingual environments. Part of your course work will be dedicated to developing skills to approach writing in English from a bilingual perspective. Also, your teacher is a second language writing specialist, so writing feedback is aimed at helping students develop linguistic and rhetorical awareness.

Book List:

A required course reader will be available during the first week of class.

Other texts will be excerpted and available in digital format.

Class Number: 21275
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 4:00pm - 5:00pm @ Haviland 321
Section Theme: Community
Section Description:

Welcome to R1A! Our theme for this Fall is Community. Humans are inherently social creatures and with the forced isolation of sheltering-in-place, we could say that fostering community is important now more than ever. Accordingly, in this class we will consider the topic of community from multiple perspectives: their formation and ways to build a strong community, the nature of belonging, the experience of exclusion, as well as migrations' impact on community. Hopefully, we will also be able to get out into the community and write about these experiences. 

We will read texts of all kinds closely and critically: short stories, nonfiction, film, and a novella. 

 

Most importantly, we’ll work on developing critical reading skills and covering the entire essay writing process, with an emphasis on revision. With our course readings as our common terrain, we’ll learn to read a variety of texts closely and carefully. We’ll discuss strategies that will help us to craft logically organized and well-written essays and to develop persuasive arguments in writing. 

Book List:
Class Number: 21276
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 12:00pm - 2:00pm @ Haviland 321
Section Theme: Lifting Our Gaze Between Worlds
Instructor: Michael Larkin
Section Description:

Drawing inspiration from the 2021 and 2020 themes of the UC Berkeley Summer Reading List for New Students ("Lift Our Gazes" and "Between Worlds," respectively) we will read, write, and talk about texts dealing with people who look clear-eyed at challenges that arise when caught having to adjust to moving between one world and another, whether they be issues of immigration, nationality, identity complexities, differing geographies, cultural clashes, technological shifts, or developmental adjustments we move through in different stages of life (including leaving home to go to college!) The class will itself be a kind of "Between Worlds" space as we move from the start of the semester to the end. Join us for the journey!

Book List:

The Undocumented Americans, by Karla Cornejo Villavicencio (This year's On the Same Page reading); Exit West, by Moshin Hamid (last year's On the Same Page reading); They Say, I Say: The Moves that Matter in Academic Writing (4th edition), by Gerald Graff and Kathy Birkenstein; other course readings available electronically through the class bCourses site.

Class Number: 21277
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 12:00pm - 2:00pm @ Wheeler 100 (ALC)
Section Theme: Family
Instructor: Margaret Salifu
Section Description:

No matter which form family takes— conservative, extended, modern, absent, or present— it remains pivotal to our lives and shapes who we are. Family units are mostly caring but often complex. We will explore variations of family and socioeconomic structures that mold such units. To help us answer questions about family, we will read texts, including Toni Morrison’s God Help the Child (GHTC), Amy Tan’s The Joy Luck Club (TJLC), and Dodie Smith’s Dear Octopus (DO). We will also watch related films/documentaries.

Book List:

Morrison, Toni. God Help the Child. Knopf, 2015. (Any edition)

Tan, Amy. The Joy Luck Club. G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1989. (Any edition)

Smith, Dodie. Dear Octopus (1938). French, 2016.

Class Number: 21266
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 2:00pm - 4:00pm @ Haviland 321
Section Theme: The Pen and the Sword: Violence, Education, and Identity
Instructor: Kim Freeman
Section Description:

Every time a mass shooting occurs, it shocks all over again. Those at schools seem particularly disturbing. We start asking why? How might it have been avoided? How can we stop this from happening again? And yet, it continues to happen. Violence is everywhere in our culture, from state-sponsored wars to domestic abuse to video games and films and, of course, mass shootings. For this course, we’ll focus on some explorations of the causes of violence and some of its representations, with an emphasis on youth and violence—why shoot at school? Why join a gang? How does violence at home affect people? How might other social factors, such as class and gender, affect violence? While I don’t expect us to answer these questions fully, and I know there are many answers to them, I hope that these texts will provide a rich array of issues for exploration in ways you might also adapt to some of your own interests. While violence is the theme of the course, the focus is on your writing. 

Book List:
Class Number: 21267
Meeting time @ place:
MW 3:00pm - 6:00pm @ Wheeler 100 (ALC)
Section Theme: The 1619 Project
Instructor: Scott Wallin
Section Description:

The New York Times Magazine's 1619 Project offers a new perspective on the United States' history. By considering our nation's birth year not as 1776 but rather when enslaved Africans were first brought to North America, the project offers various written and visual texts that "place the consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans at the very center of the story we tell ourselves about who we are as a country." Drawing from the 1619 Project and a reading list offered by the 1619 Project Law School, we will read, discuss, and write about essays, books, and films that focus on American capitalism, segregation in real estate and lending practices, healthcare, incarceration, and cultural production.   

Book List:

TBA

Pages