Courses

All Courses

CW R1A - Accelerated Reading and Composition

Summer 2021
Description 

This intensive, accelerated course satisfies concurrently the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement and the first half (Part A) of the Reading & Composition Requirement. It offers students structured, sustained, and highly articulated practice in the recursive processes entailed in reading, critical analysis, and composing. Readings include imaginative, expository, and argumentative texts comparable in complexity to those encountered in the lower-division curriculum. Texts are chosen to represent views and perspectives of authors from diverse social and cultural backgrounds. Students read five thematically related book-length texts, or the equivalent, drawn from a range of genres, in addition to non-print sources. In response to these materials, they craft numerous short pieces leading up to three to five essays—works that include elements of narration, exposition, and argument. Students write a minimum of 40 pages of prose during this semester and they compose an annotated portfolio that showcases their best work.

Note: Specialized sections are available for multilingual student writers. These sections are marked (MSW) below.

Available in 
Summer
Prerequisites 
Placement by the Analytical Writing Placement Examination
Units and Format 
6 units – Nine hours of lecture/discussion per week for 10 weeks (Session B)
Grading Option 
Must be taken for a letter grade for R&C credit
Fulfills 
Reading & Composition: 1st half (Part A)
Entry Level Writing

Section

Theme

Time

Instructor

Class Number: 10621
Meeting time @ place:
- @ Online - Time TBA
Section Theme: TBA
Instructor: Donnett Flash
Section Description:

This course is offered in Session B (June 7-August 13, 2021).

Book List:

Breathe: A Letter to my Sons, Imani Perry

When the Emperor was Divine, Julie Otsuka

Class Number: 10630
Meeting time @ place:
- @ Online - Time TBA
Section Theme: Space and Place
Instructor: Chisako A. Cole
Section Description:

Freedom and security are vulnerable to being compromised by fear and misconceptions. We will explore this conflict by looking at the use of public and private spaces, proximity to others, and proximity to truth. Students will examine a variety of sources, including a historical novel, a nonfiction work, a film, and photography. Writing assignments will include an image analysis, theme analysis, and  an autoethnographic essay.

Book List:

Julie Otsuka, When the Emperor Was Divine (2003). Anchor Books.
Bryan Stevenson, Just Mercy (2014). Random House Books.
Eric Klinenberg, Palaces for the People (2018). Excerpt pdf on bCourses.

Class Number: 10649
Meeting time @ place:
- @ Online - Time TBA
Section Theme: Technology and Human Behavior
Instructor: Joe De Quattro
Section Description:

This course is offered in Session B (June 7-August 13, 2021).

This course will focus on the technology age and its influence on human behavior. Through close readings of essays and fiction, and through class discussion, we will explore the idea of identity, perception, fate and character in the 21st century. In the process we will discuss the increasing need for speed in our every day lives and its advantages and disadvantages.

 

 

Book List:

The Stranger pdf Where We Stand pdf A collection of readings via bCourses

Class Number: 10652
Meeting time @ place:
- @ Online - Time TBA
Section Theme: Friends, Allies, Enemies
Instructor: Becky Hsu
Section Description:

What do the words "friend," "ally," and "enemy" mean, especially against the backdrop of a culturally and racially diverse nation like the United States?  How do those words exist in harmony and in tension, with each other? 

We will explore these terms through the context of various writers and filmmakers, even as we focus on our primary goal: to become competent academic writers. To achieve this ultimate goal, we will  tackle and stretch the concept of "writing well," especially for an academic environment. I will ask you to write 3 different types of essays, in addition to a reflective essay on your growth as writer in this course. At the end of the course, you will revise and compile your essays into a final writing portfolio that will showcase this growth.

Since this is a 6-unit course (thus combining the value of 2 courses), the workload for this course will be heavy. You can expect to spend anywhere from 2 to 12+ hours, outside of class time, on your coursework. However, I will break assignments down into smaller, achievable goals, so, as long as you keep pace with the course and commit yourself to the work, this course should be manageable. 

Book List:

I will provide selections from multiple texts, ranging from Cathy Park Hong's Minor Feelings to Isabel Wilkerson's Caste, all of which I will make available for free over bCourses. These texts, added together, should take the place of 2 book-length texts.

If time allows, we will also watch and analyze the 1984 film The Karate Kid, as well as select episodes from the TV series Cobra Kai.

Class Number: 10654
Meeting time @ place:
- @ Online - Time TBA
Section Theme: Community
Section Description:

This course is offered in Session B (June 7-August 13, 2021).

Welcome to R1A! Our theme for this Summer is Community. Humans are inherently social creatures and with the forced isolation of sheltering-in-place, we could say that fostering community is important now more than ever. Accordingly, in this class we will consider the topic of community from multiple perspectives: their formation and how to build a strong community, the nature of belonging, the experience of exclusion, as well as migrations' impact on community. This course will pay particular attention to the ways in which marginalized groups build and sustain community while also examining the limits and compromises inherent in public advocacy.

We will read texts of all kinds closely and critically: short stories, nonfiction, film, and a novella. 

Book List: