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CW R1A - Accelerated Reading and Composition

Spring 2021
Description 

This intensive, accelerated course satisfies concurrently the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement and the first half (Part A) of the Reading & Composition Requirement. It offers students structured, sustained, and highly articulated practice in the recursive processes entailed in reading, critical analysis, and composing. Readings include imaginative, expository, and argumentative texts comparable in complexity to those encountered in the lower-division curriculum. Texts are chosen to represent views and perspectives of authors from diverse social and cultural backgrounds. Students read five thematically related book-length texts, or the equivalent, drawn from a range of genres, in addition to non-print sources. In response to these materials, they craft numerous short pieces leading up to three to five essays—works that include elements of narration, exposition, and argument. Students write a minimum of 40 pages of prose during this semester and they compose an annotated portfolio that showcases their best work.

Available in 
Spring, Summer, Fall
Prerequisites 
None
Units and Format 
6 units - Six hours of lecture/discussion per week
Grading Option 
Must be taken for a letter grade for R&C credit
Fulfills 
Reading & Composition: 1st half (Part A)
Entry Level Writing

Section

Theme

Time

Instructor

Class Number: 21832
Meeting time @ place:
TUTH 6:30pm - 9:30pm @ Online
Section Theme: FUTURESPACE
Instructor: Belinda Kremer
Section Description:

FUTURESPACE: "the future” as it co-exists with "the now.” Our primary interests are contemporary imaginations and representations of the near future, with a focus on artificial intelligence (AI), including emergent "sentience" and its applications. We'll analyze popular streaming TV (Black Mirror), and documentary film; in the novel Tell the Machine Goodnight, we'll consider an AI that uses DNA swabs to prescribe "contentment plans." We'll read the non-fiction prose of expert AI practitioners, researchers, and philosophers of science, tackling their arguments on sentience as savior and existential threat.

We'll be synchronously online  ~50% of each class, and use other learning-teaching modes ~50%. You do need to be fully available for each class.

FUTURESPACE asks: 

Artificial Intelligence: Will We Survive What We Create? 

The Fears in Our Fictions: Justified? Or Paranoid?

The Near Future: What Does Science Say?

Super-Intelligence: How Do We Maximize Its Opportunities? 

In FUTURESPACE, you'll expand how you: read, through meta-cognition & problem-solving; analyze complex texts; generate meaningful inquiries & theses; and compose, through the production of "classic" alphabetic prose texts & multimodal projects. You'll culminate your semester with a website portfolio showcasing your best work.

Book List:

 Please purchase/rent 1--4, below, by our 1st class, and in print, unless print creates an access barrier for you. With our course fully online, off-screen texts are preferable when possible. Edition provided where the edition matters. Remember to order early; COVID-19 means extra time for shipping.  

1. The Sentient Machine: The Coming Age of Artificial Intelligence  Amir Husain   Genre: Non-fiction prose

2. Tell the Machine Goodnight   Katie Williams   Genre: Novel

3. They Say, I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing   4th edition (w/ or w/o readings; find your best price)  Genre: Rhetoric/Writer's Handbook

4. Critical Thinking, Thoughtful Writing  Chaffee, John, ed. 6th edition  Genre: Rhetoric/Reader  Note: If you rent the digital text from VitalSource/Cengage, you likely want to wait until right before classes start, as the rental period is 4 months

SUPERINTELLIGENCE: Paths, Dangers, Strategies   Nick Bostrom  Genre: Non-fiction prose, researched argument  Access: e-book; unlimited free access through UC Berkeley Libraries

Black Mirror   Charlie Brooker    Genre: Drama/Sci-Fi/Thriller— TV Series   Access: Netflix 

Near-future films  Genre: Varies  Access: Kanopy.com  (free)

Class Number: 21833
Meeting time @ place:
TUTH 11:00am - 2:00pm @ Online
Section Theme: FUTURESPACE
Instructor: Belinda Kremer
Section Description:

FUTURESPACE: "the future” as it co-exists with "the now.” Our primary interests are contemporary imaginations and representations of the near future, with a focus on artificial intelligence (AI), including emergent "sentience" and its applications. We'll analyze popular streaming TV (Black Mirror), and documentary film; in the novel Tell the Machine Goodnight, we'll consider an AI that uses DNA swabs to prescribe "contentment plans." We'll read the non-fiction prose of expert AI practitioners, researchers, and philosophers of science, tackling their arguments on sentience as savior and existential threat.

We'll be synchronously online  ~50% of each class, and use other learning-teaching modes ~50%. You do need to be fully available for each class.

FUTURESPACE asks: 

Artificial Intelligence: Will We Survive What We Create? 

The Fears in Our Fictions: Justified? Or Paranoid?

The Near Future: What Does Science Say?

Super-Intelligence: How Do We Maximize Its Opportunities? 

In FUTURESPACE, you'll expand how you: read, through meta-cognition & problem-solving; analyze complex texts; generate meaningful inquiries & theses; and compose, through the production of "classic" alphabetic prose texts & multimodal projects. You'll culminate your semester with a website portfolio showcasing your best work.

Book List:

Please purchase or rent 1--4, below, by our 1st class, and in print, unless print creates an access barrier for you. With our course fully online, off-screen texts are preferable when possible. Edition provided where the edition matters. Remember to order early; COVID-19 means extra time for shipping.  

1. The Sentient Machine: The Coming Age of Artificial Intelligence  Amir Husain   Genre: Non-fiction prose

2. Tell the Machine Goodnight   Katie Williams   Genre: Novel

3. They Say, I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing   4th edition (w/ or w/o readings; find your best price)  Genre: Rhetoric/Writer's Handbook

4. Critical Thinking, Thoughtful Writing  Chaffee, John, ed. 6th edition  Genre: Rhetoric/Reader  Note: If you rent the digital text from VitalSource/Cengage, you likely want to wait until right before classes start, as the rental period is 4 months

SUPERINTELLIGENCE: Paths, Dangers, Strategies   Nick Bostrom  Genre: Non-fiction prose, researched argument  Access: e-book; unlimited free access through UC Berkeley Libraries

Black Mirror   Charlie Brooker    Genre: Drama/Sci-Fi/Thriller— TV Series   Access: Netflix 

Near-future films  Genre: Varies  Access: Kanopy.com  (free)

Class Number: 21834
Meeting time @ place:
TUTH 11:00am - 2:00pm @ Online
Section Theme: Power
Instructor: Becky Hsu
Section Description:

This course has one overarching goal: to prepare you for college writing. Thus, this section will expose you to a variety of primary sources and types of academic writing. I will ask you to write 4 different types of essays. Counting rough drafts and revisions, along with smaller assignments, you can therefore expect to produce about 40 pages or more of written work.

In other words, you will devote many hours to this course. Since this course amounts to 6 units, expect that your workload outside of class can range anywhere from 2 hours (on a very light week) to 12 hours or more (on a heavy week). However, do note: we will NOT be spending 6 hours a week on Zoom together! (That would be nuts.) Expect, instead, to spend anywhere from 30 minutes to 3 hours a week on Zoom, with either just me or the entire class.)

“Okay, fine,” you’re thinking. “I’ll be working a lot. But what will we be reading and writing about?!”

The simple answer to that question lies in the course title for this section: power.

A more complicated answer: we will explore and analyze texts and films that compel us to think about what “power” is. What can power look like? Who/what wields it? How can power corrupt us and can we avoid that? Or is acquiring power an inevitable path toward corruption? There are no easy answers to these questions, but, with any luck and an open mind, we should begin to plumb the depths of "power" while also developing our own "powers" as writers. 

Book List:

I will make available - for free - all of the core texts we use in this class, either as PDFs or as weblinks. I will also strive to make any films we watch freely available, through our campus library.

Main books:

On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century by Timothy Snyder

Tituba of Salem Village by Ann Petry

Main films:

The Karate Kid (1984)

The Karate Kid (2010)

Cobra Kai (optional; depends on access to Netflix)

In addition to our core texts and films, I will also add a number of shorter readings, in the form of essays and articles. These texts will be made available for free over bCourses.

Class Number: 21835
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 10:00am - 12:00pm @ Online
Section Theme: Cross-Cultural Conversations
Section Description:

Cross-cultural conversations are more important than ever. National radio journalist Celeste Headlee calls conversation "a survival skill" that requires exercise and intention (We Need To Talk 3). We practice listening actively and developing skills to understand those around us and their diverse cultural backgrounds. We watch TED Talks like "The Danger of a Single Story" by novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and we study how to engage with others whose cultures differ from our own, increasing our Cultural Intelligence (CQ). We also read amazing fiction like the novel Exit West by Mohsin Hamid, the 2020 selection for On the Same Page, our campus-wide book-in-common program. Shortlisted for the 2017 Booker prize, Exit West is an inventive and timely love story about two migrants who are forced to flee their homes and navigate utterly new terrains, geographical, cultural, and emotional. We also read amazing nonfiction like Reyna Grande's memoir The Distance Between Us that can help us “overcome identity politics,” as novelist Elif Shafak observes. Our course material also includes riveting documentaries and other credible, relevant, well-written articles that can help us see where our own cultural biases lie. In short, we expand our worlds as we write excellent papers, too. 

Book List:

Required reading:

Exit West by Mohsin Hamid; The Distance Between Us by Reyna Grande

Required viewing:

"The Danger of a Single Story" by Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie

Online Reader of essays, Atlantic and other articles, excerpts

Class Number: 21836
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 4:00pm - 6:00pm @ Online
Section Theme: Cross-Cultural Conversations
Section Description:

Cross-cultural conversations are more important than ever. National radio journalist Celeste Headlee calls conversation "a survival skill" that requires exercise and intention (We Need To Talk 3). We practice listening actively and developing skills to understand those around us and their diverse cultural backgrounds. We watch TED Talks like "The Danger of a Single Story" by novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and we study how to engage with others whose cultures differ from our own, increasing our Cultural Intelligence (CQ). We also read amazing fiction like the novel Exit West by Mohsin Hamid, the 2020 selection for On the Same Page, our campus-wide book-in-common program. Shortlisted for the 2017 Booker prize, Exit West is an inventive and timely love story about two migrants who are forced to flee their homes and navigate utterly new terrains, geographical, cultural, and emotional. We also read amazing nonfiction like Reyna Grande's memoir The Distance Between Us that can help us “overcome identity politics,” as novelist Elif Shafak observes. Our course material also includes riveting documentaries and other credible, relevant, well-written articles that can help us see where our own cultural biases lie. In short, we expand our worlds as we write excellent papers, too. 

Book List:

Required reading:

Exit West by Mohsin Hamid; The Distance Between Us by Reyna Grande

Required viewing:

"The Danger of a Single Story" by Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie

Online Reader of essays, Atlantic and other articles, excerpts

Class Number: 21837
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 12:00pm - 2:00pm @ Online
Section Theme: Community
Section Description:

Welcome to R1A! Our theme for this Spring is Community. Humans are inherently social creatures and with the forced isolation of sheltering-in-place, we could say that fostering community is important now more than ever. Accordingly, in this class we will consider the topic of community from multiple perspectives: their formation, the nature of belonging, the experience of exclusion, as well as migrations' impact on community. This course will pay particular attention to the ways in which marginalized groups build and sustain community while also examining the limits and compromises inherent in public advocacy.

We will read texts of all kinds closely and critically: short stories, nonfiction, film, and a novella. Students will gain experience honing their academic and analytical writing skills to prepare them for writing at the college level. 

Book List:
Class Number: 21838
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 10:00am - 12:00pm @ Online
Section Theme: Different Worlds
Instructor: Michelle Baptiste
Section Description:

In this multilingual-designated section, all students will self-identify as bilingual and bring that asset to our discussions of the complexities of language and the writing process, as well as enrich our discussions of the course theme: different worlds.  We will explore moving between worlds and across personal, political, racial, cultural, linguistic, educational, philosophical, and geographical spheres.  You will read about divergent yet overlapping topics -- migration & immigration, the political & personal, injustice & the fight for equality, love & coming-of-age.

 As you develop your voice as a writer in this intensive reading and writing course, you will engage with texts from various genres, including memoir, essay, and both popular and scholarly articles; you will also get to write in diverse genres--including text analysis, opinion editorial, and narrative.  And you will publish your writing in different formats as well, as you cultivate your voice/s as a writer.

 

Book List:

Richard Blanco's coming-of-age memoir The Prince of Los Cucuyos 

Michelle Obama's 2018 autobiography Becoming

Writing for Success (a free open source writer's reference resource)

Other excerpted texts, essays, & scholarly articles available on bCourses

Class Number: 21839
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 10:00am - 12:00pm @ Online
Section Theme: Technology and Human Behavior
Instructor: Joe De Quattro
Section Description:

This course will focus on the technology age and its influence on human behavior. Through close readings of essays and fiction, and through class discussion, we will explore the idea of identity, perception, fate and character in the 21st century. In the process we will discuss the increasing need for speed in our every day lives and its advantages and disadvantages.

Book List:

The Stranger pdf Where We Stand pdf A collection of readings via bCourses

Class Number: 21840
Meeting time @ place:
- @ Online - Time TBA
Section Theme: The Rhetoric of Science
Instructor: Michal Reznizki
Section Description:

What is Science? How is it being communicated to the public? In this course, we will focus on scientific communication and on how scientific advances are being “translated” to popular audiences. We will read two books about the topic and will explore rhetorical elements of both academic and popular articles on different scientific topics.

 

 

Book List:

Houston We Have a Narrative by Randy Olson

Bad Advice by Paul Offit

Class Number: 21841
Meeting time @ place:
TUTH 2:00pm - 5:00pm @ Online
Section Theme: The Pen and the Sword: Violence, Education, and Identity
Instructor: Kim Freeman
Section Description:

Every time a mass shooting occurs, it shocks all over again. Those at schools seem particularly disturbing. We start asking why? How might it have been avoided? How can we stop this from happening again? And yet, it continues to happen. Violence is everywhere in our culture, from state-sponsored wars to domestic abuse to video games and films and, of course, mass shootings. For this course, we’ll focus on some explorations of the causes of violence and some of its representations, with an emphasis on youth and violence—why shoot at school? Why join a gang? How does violence at home affect people? How might other social factors, such as class and gender, affect violence? While I don’t expect us to answer these questions fully, and I know there are many answers to them, I hope that these texts will provide a rich array of issues for exploration in ways you might also adapt to some of your own interests. While violence is the theme of the course, the focus is on your writing. Sources include , Benjamin Percy's "Refresh, Refresh," Moshin Hamid's, Exit West, and Michael Moore's Bowling for Columbine, among others.

Book List:

Pages