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CW R1A - Accelerated Reading and Composition

Fall 2019
Description 

This intensive, accelerated course satisfies concurrently the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement and the first half (Part A) of the Reading & Composition Requirement. It offers students structured, sustained, and highly articulated practice in the recursive processes entailed in reading, critical analysis, and composing. Readings include imaginative, expository, and argumentative texts comparable in complexity to those encountered in the lower-division curriculum. Texts are chosen to represent views and perspectives of authors from diverse social and cultural backgrounds. Students read five thematically related book-length texts, or the equivalent, drawn from a range of genres, in addition to non-print sources. In response to these materials, they craft numerous short pieces leading up to three to five essays—works that include elements of narration, exposition, and argument. Students write a minimum of 40 pages of prose during this semester and they compose an annotated portfolio that showcases their best work.

Note: Specialized sections are available for multilingual student writers. These sections are marked (MSW) below.

Available in 
Fall and Spring
Prerequisites 
Placement by the Analytical Writing Placement Examination
Units and Format 
6 units – Six hours of lecture/discussion per week
Grading Option 
Must be taken for a letter grade for R&C credit
Fulfills 
Reading & Composition: 1st half (Part A)

Section

Theme

Time

Instructor

Class Number: 21408
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 8:00am - 10:00am @ Barrows 118 (ALC)
Section Theme: Cross-Cultural Conversations
Section Description:

With the rise of neo-nationalism, seen the world over in Brexit and in other movements as well as in America’s 2016 election, cross-cultural conversations are more important than ever. We will explore Celeste Headlee’s We Need To Talk, and we will practice listening actively, developing skills to understand those around us and their diverse cultural backgrounds. We will watch TED Talks like "The Danger of a Single Story" by novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and we will study how to engage with others whose cultures differ from our own, increasing our Cultural Intelligence (CQ). We will also read amazing nonfiction like Reyna Grande's The Distance Between Us that can help us “overcome identity politics,” as novelist Elif Shafak observes. Our course material also includes riveting documentaries and articles that can help us see where our own cultural biases lie. In short, we’ll expand our worlds as we write excellent papers, too. 

 

Book List:

Required Texts:

We Need To Talk (Celeste Headlee); The Distance Between Us (Reyna Grande); Online Reader of essays, articles, and excerpts from books; CultureGPS Lite (Geert Hofstede and itim International’s free smartphone app); “The Danger of a Single Story” (Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie); Other online resources (documentaries, TED talks).

Class Number: 21411
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 10:00am - 12:00pm @ Wheeler 100 (ALC)
Section Theme: Sunshine and Strife: The Living Legacy of California's Paradise Myth
Instructor: Ben Spanbock
Section Description:

For generations, Indigenous Peoples have viewed California landscapes as sacred. When Europeans arrived, they mapped onto these landscapes their own ideas of a Christian Paradise on Earth. Since that time, popular renderings of California as a paradise have been influential, enduring, and diverse, all the while establishing the grounds for active refutation, resistance, and critique. But what does this longstanding historical association between place and idea look like today? This class will examine different texts related to the Bay Area's vibrant contemporary culture, and work to understand them both on their own terms and within this framework. The greater purpose of this class is to introduce practical methods for reading “texts” (print, visual, auditory, social, etc.) and writing to engage with the dynamic issues they raise. Working in and with a variety of genres, modes, and styles, students will be asked to read and think deeply and carefully, and to practice both formal and informal writing through sustained engagement with the revision process.

Book List:

Bacon, Nora. The Well Crafted Sentence (3rd edition)

Carreyrou, John. Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup

Lyle, Erick (ed). Streetopia

Orange, Tommy. There There

Additional readings available on bCourses.

"HERETHERE" Steve Gillman 2011 (Image: East Bay Times)

 

 

 

Class Number: 21412
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 10:00am - 12:00pm @ Dwinelle 134
Section Theme: The Capacious Identity
Instructor: Chisako Cole
Section Description:

How do we define identity? How do we form our identity and what affects it? In this class, we’ll explore how we see ourselves and how others perceive us based on space, expectations and language. Key concepts we’ll focus on are public places vs. private spaces, authenticity and commercialization, gentrification, and language acquisition. Students will examine a variety of texts- writing assignments will include a rhetorical theme analysis, persuasive essay and a fieldwork analysis.

Book List:

Palaces For The People (Klinenberg)

Just Mercy (Stevenson)

Course Reader

Class Number: 21413
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 10:00am - 12:00pm @ Evans 65
Section Theme: Exploring Ethics: Social Justice
Instructor: Donnett Flash
Section Description:
Book List:
Class Number: 21414
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 10:00am - 12:00pm @ Mulford 230 (ALC)
Section Theme: The Pen and Sword: Violence, Education, and Identity
Instructor: Kim Freeman
Section Description:

COURSE THEME: THE PEN AND THE SWORD, VIOLENCE, EDUCATION, AND IDENTITY

 

Every time a mass shooting occurs, it shocks all over again. Those at schools seem particularly disturbing. We start asking why? How might it have been avoided? How can we stop this from happening again? And yet, it continues to happen. Violence is everywhere in our culture, from state-sponsored wars to domestic abuse to video games and films and, of course, mass shootings. For this course, we’ll focus on some explorations of the causes of violence and some of its representations, with an emphasis on youth and violence—why shoot at school? Why join a gang? How does violence at home affect people? How might other social factors, such as class and gender, affect violence? While I don’t expect us to answer these questions fully, and I know there are many answers to them, I hope that these texts will provide a rich array of issues for exploration in ways you might also adapt to some of your own interests. While violence is the theme of the course, the focus is on your writing. Authors likely to include Tommy Orange (There, There), Stephen Pinker, and Michael Moore, among others.

 

Book List:
Class Number: 21424
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 3:00pm - 5:00pm @ Dwinelle 233
Section Theme: Refusals
Instructor: Tara Hottman
Section Description:

This class will turn to ways in which refusals were delivered, discussed, and conceived of in texts from a variety of disciplines and genres. We’ll read and discuss fictional refusals, such as Bartleby the Scrivener’s famous line “I would prefer not to,” and other significant moments in literature, film and other media that feature an expression of rejection. We’ll examine the ways in which saying no has been conceived of as a form of protest in acts of civil disobedience and attempts to “opt out” of political, social, and economic contexts. Finally, we’ll take a closer look at our current age of big data, algorithms, and social media and examine how the modes of opting in and out have changed.

Most importantly, we’ll work on developing the critical reading and analytical writing skills that will help us to articulate what happens when we approach texts of all kinds. With our course readings as our common terrain, we’ll learn to read a variety of texts closely and carefully, focusing on strategies for critical reading and re-reading. We’ll discuss strategies that will help us to craft logically organized and well-written essays and to develop persuasive and increasingly complex analytical arguments in writing.

Book List:

Course reader (to be purchased at Replica copy shop on Oxford), additional books TBA

Class Number: 21425
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 12:00pm - 2:00pm @ Wheeler 100 (ALC)
Section Theme: Music: Culture, Community, and Identity
Instructor: Jordan Ruyle
Section Description:

This course focuses on topics in music, exploring social and cultural roles music plays. You’ll read fiction from James Baldwin, Zora Neale Hurston, David Sedaris, and others as you consider the roles music plays in our lives. You’ll also explore our physiological and social relationships with music through non-fiction from Oliver Sacks, Joan Morgan, and Daniel Levitin. In addition, you’ll read and respond to academic texts in ethnomusicology that examine the place of music and performance in culture.

Expect to read a lot, write a lot, and revise a lot. While responding critically to these texts and ideas, you’ll strengthen your academic writing. You’ll learn about and practice techniques for developing arguments, crafting essays, revising papers, and proofreading your writing. You will be challenged, but you will also be rewarded by becoming a stronger writer and thinker.

Book List:

A required course reader will be available during the first week of class.

Other texts will be excerpted and available in digital format.

Class Number: 21426
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 12:00pm - 2:00pm @ Barrows 186
Section Theme: Beautiful Liars: Belief and the Complexity of Deception
Instructor: Ryan Sloan
Section Description:

Nothing fools you better than the lie you tell yourself -- Teller

Come behind the curtain. We'll examine why every culture believes in magic; weigh how modern illusionists and con men fool their willing audiences, often with an understanding of neuroscience and psychology; explore the rich thrill of rituals and belief through interviews & personal essay; and experience how rivalry can change a performer forever.

Along the way, you'll become a stronger writer, reader & thinker, creating a range of expository and analytical essays while engaging with texts and films you won't soon forget.

Book List:

The Honest Truth About Dishonesty (Ariely); They Say / I Say (Graff/Birkenstein); Course Reader. Films: An Honest Liar

Class Number: 21415
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 2:00pm - 4:00pm @ Dwinelle 134
Section Theme: Sunshine and Strife: The Living Legacy of California's Paradise Myth
Instructor: Ben Spanbock
Section Description:

For generations, Indigenous Peoples have viewed California landscapes as sacred. When Europeans arrived, they mapped onto these landscapes their own ideas of a Christian Paradise on Earth. Since that time, popular renderings of California as a paradise have been influential, enduring, and diverse, all the while establishing the grounds for active refutation, resistance, and critique. But what does this longstanding historical association between place and idea look like today? This class will examine different texts related to the Bay Area's vibrant contemporary culture, and work to understand them both on their own terms and within this framework. The greater purpose of this class is to introduce practical methods for reading “texts” (print, visual, auditory, social, etc.) and writing to engage with the dynamic issues they raise. Working in and with a variety of genres, modes, and styles, students will be asked to read and think deeply and carefully, and to practice both formal and informal writing through sustained engagement with the revision process.

Book List:

Bacon, Nora. The Well Crafted Sentence (3rd edition)

Carreyrou, John. Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup

Lyle, Erick (ed). Streetopia

Orange, Tommy. There There

Additional readings available on bCourses.

The Luggage Store Presents: Streetopia

 

 

 

Class Number: 21416
Meeting time @ place:
MW 3:00pm - 6:00pm @ Haviland 214
Section Theme: Madness in Culture
Instructor: Scott Wallin
Section Description:

 

Psychiatry tells us that madness is “mental illness” based in individual biology. We may welcome this point of view when we are desperate to avoid suffering. But what are some of the other stories we tell? When does madness take shape in response to social and political conflict? Furthermore, not all madness is bad. Aristotle observes that “no excellent soul is exempt from a mixture of madness.” Madness may entice us with its mystery, individuality, insight, or power. When we look at madness in culture, we see that it is not a simple, stable, objective medical condition but rather a fluid social construction borne out of social conditions, the stories we tell, the images we make, and the values we ascribe. Through your critical reading and writing about various forms of literature, you will join these larger conversations and share your own responses, questions, and ideas on what it means to be mad and how we might think and feel about it.

Book List:

 

Adelina, Anthony. Las Hociconas: three locas with big mouths and even bigger brains (ISBN: 9780988967342)

 

Ellison, Ralph. Invisible Man (ISBN: 9780679732761)

 

Kesey, Ken. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. (ISBN: 9780451163967)

 

Lee, Young Jean. We’re Gonna Die (ISBN: 9781559364430)

 

Additional readings will be made available electronically on bCourses:

 

Gilman, Charlotte Perkins.1892. ”The Yellow Wallpaper. A Story,” The New England Magazine.

Graff, Gerald & Cathy Birkenstein. 2018. Selected chapters from "They Say/ I Say": The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing, 4th ed. New York: Norton & Company.

Lewis, Bradley. 2006. “A Mad Fight: Psychiatry and disability activism” in The Disability Studies Reader, Ed. Lennard J. Davis. Psychology Press.

Lunsford, Andrea. 2010. “Rhetorical Analysis” in Everything’s an Argument. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s.

MacNamara, Ashley Y. 2006. “Anatomy of Flight” in Navigating the Space Between Brilliance and Madness. The Icarus Project.

Rosenwasser, David and Jill Stephen. 2012. Selections from Writing Analytically, 6th ed. Boston: Wadsworth.

University of Minnesota Libraries. Writing for Success. (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.)

Williams, Joseph M. 2010. “The Ethics of Style” in Style: Lessons in clarity and grace. 10th ed. New York: Pearson Longman. 

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