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CW R4B - Reading, Composition, and Research

Fall 2017
Description 

This writing seminar satisfies the second half (Part B) of the Reading & Composition Requirement. It offers students structured, sustained, and highly articulated practice in the recursive processes entailed in reading and composing, as well as critical analysis. The seminar affords students guided practice through the stages involved in creating a research paper. Students read five thematically related book-length texts, or the equivalent, drawn from a range of genres, in addition to various non-print sources. In response to these materials, students craft several short pieces leading up to two longer essays—works of exposition and/or argumentation. Students also draft a research paper, developing a research question, gathering, evaluating, and synthesizing information from texts and other sources. Elements of the research process, such as proposals, annotated bibliographies, an abstracts, "works cited" lists, and the like, are submitted, along with the final report, in a research portfolio. Students write a minimum of 32 pages of expository prose during the semester.

Note: Specialized sections are available for multilingual student writers.  These sections are marked (MSW) below.

Available in 
Fall and Spring
Prerequisites 
Satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement and the first half (Part A) of the Reading & Composition Requirement
Units and Format 
4 units – Three hours of seminar/discussion per week
Grading Option 
Must be taken for a letter grade for R&C credit
Fulfills 
Reading & Composition: 2nd half (Part B)

Section

Theme

Time

Instructor

Class Number: 13558
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 11:00am - 12:00pm @ 174 Barrows Hall
Section Theme: Stories of Sustainability
Instructor: Kim Freeman
Section Description:

Stories of sustainability, be they about climate change, peak oil, clean water, or population growth, are all around us. Not only are they a common occurrence on newspaper front pages and a popular theme in social media like Twitter, but it is also an issue that affects an array of subcultures, from nations and neighborhoods to academic disciplines and the arts. One of the key issues is whether or not various societies will be able to maintain their current ways of living. The aim of this course is not to prove or disprove any particular aspect of sustainability. Rather the theme of this course focuses on how various cultures tell stories about sustainability. We’ll read and watch an array of media, from popular forms, such as Pinterest posts, films, and, as well novels, and newspapers. We’ll also look at some academic forms, such as research articles and reviews, from a variety of disciplines, such as biology, international relations, economics, as well as fiction and art. Authors likely to be included are Elizabeth Kolbert, Alan Weisman, and Naomi Klein and, among others. Students will writing a variety of analytical essays, as well as write their own research project.

Book List:
Class Number: 44763
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 12:00pm - 1:00pm @ 121 Latimer Hall
Section Theme: Radical Change, Robot Overlords, and You
Instructor: Ryan Sloan
Section Description:

“The future is no more uncertain than the present.” Walt Whitman

The future has always been a slippery concept. We’re in an exhilarating -- and some would say troubling -- age of radical advances in the fields of artificial intelligence, bioengineering, augmented reality, driverless cars, human enhancement, and more. So what will all of this mean for you in five years and fifty years? Our course will explore contemporary and past visions of tomorrow, and weigh some of the most interesting problems being explored by humanists, scientists, futurists and popular culture.

You’ll work with a number of digital platforms, have rich discussions with your peers, develop stronger analytical skills, and conduct research on a sustained project of your own choosing: the future of robots / medicine / internet shaming / social media / music / immigration / travel / gender / gentrification / dating / education / [insert your passion here!].  

Book List:

Texts: All texts available at University Press Bookstore [2430 Bancroft Way] and the Cal student bookstore. Most of our reading will be free, digital work collected by me in the Digital Course Reader on bCourses.

The Singularity is Near: When Humans Transcend Biology (Kurzweil)
Craft of Research (Booth)
Digital Course Reader (accessible on our class bCourses site).

Films & Video: clips from Ex Machina, Blade Runner, Metropolis, Westworld, Black Mirror, Wall-E

Class Number: 13559
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 2:00pm - 3:00pm @ 41 Evans Hall
Section Theme: Radical Change, Robot Overlords, and You
Instructor: Ryan Sloan
Section Description:

“The future is no more uncertain than the present.” Walt Whitman

The future has always been a slippery concept. We’re in an exhilarating -- and some would say troubling -- age of radical advances in the fields of artificial intelligence, bioengineering, augmented reality, driverless cars, human enhancement, and more. So what will all of this mean for you in five years and fifty years? Our course will explore contemporary and past visions of tomorrow, and weigh some of the most interesting problems being explored by humanists, scientists, futurists and popular culture.

You’ll work with a number of digital platforms, have rich discussions with your peers, develop stronger analytical skills, and conduct research on a sustained project of your own choosing: the future of robots / medicine / internet shaming / social media / music / immigration / travel / gender / gentrification / dating / education / [insert your passion here!].  

Book List:

Texts: All texts available at University Press Bookstore [2430 Bancroft Way] and the Cal student bookstore. Most of our reading will be free, digital work collected by me in the Digital Course Reader on bCourses.

The Singularity is Near: When Humans Transcend Biology (Kurzweil)
Craft of Research (Booth)
Digital Course Reader (accessible on our class bCourses site).

Films & Video: clips from Ex Machina, Blade Runner, Metropolis, Westworld, Black Mirror, Wall-E

Class Number: 13560
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 2:00pm - 3:00pm @ 122 Latimer Hall
Section Theme: Native American Peoples & Cultures: Confronting Injustices
Instructor: Michelle Baptiste
Section Description:

This course examines and then moves beyond stereotypes to take a multi-disciplinary, multi-media approach towards researching and understanding challenges faced by present day Native peoples of the Americas.  Students explore divergent perspectives as they develop their voice as writers and researchers--choosing among a diverse array of topics to investigate in light of Native American activism: from education, gender, literature, politics, and histories to medical practices, religions, economies, businesses, and languages. 

Book List:

Alexie, S. (2003).  Ten little Indians.  New York: Grove Press.  ISBN 978-0802141170

Bigelow, B. & Petersen, B., Eds.  (2003).  Rethinking Columbus: The Next 500 Years.  Milwaukee: Rethinking Schools.  ISBN 978- 0942961201

Bishop, W., & Zemliansky, P, Eds.  (2001).  The Subject Is Research: Processes and Practices.  Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook Publishers.  ISBN 0867095725 

Class Number: 13561
Meeting time @ place:
TUTH 9:30am - 11:00am @ 54 Barrows Hall
Section Theme: TBA
Instructor: John Levine
Section Description:
Book List:
Class Number: 13562
Meeting time @ place:
TUTH 11:00am - 12:30pm @ 238 Kroeber Hall
Section Theme: Monsters and Modernity
Instructor: Jonathan Lang
Section Description:

Monsters used to represent fear of the unknown: unmapped regions in the medieval period were marked by dragons; imperialists in the 19th century bringing the "light" of civilization into the dark continent of Africa feared cannibals. Given the scientific basis of the modern period, would it not be accurate to say that we no longer believe in monsters, that they survive in the modern period if only so that they can serve as the very sign of an unenlightened, and superstitious past? No. Monsters have not been banished to the regions of superstition; they have not been relegated entirely to the past. Once we get over the fear that they might pop out from under our beds, we run to the cinema to delight in observing their contemporary manifestations: as mad scientists, bestial men and women, re-animated corpses, and cyborgs. In the modern period, monsters remain as figures not simply of fear and fascination but of real use. Monsters persist as an emblem of anxiety about a past that is too rapidly disintegrating so as to compromise the very structures of society; or alternatively as a mode of protest against the modernity of the modern period with its new forms of regulation and social control; or then again as the sign of a compromised future wherein the representation of the monster serves to question the "progress of progress," and direct suspicion onto the modern projects of scinece, industry and technology. Two analytical papers; one  research paper.

Book List:

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (Robert Louis Stevenson), Dracula (Bram Stoker), Beloved (Toni Morrison), Craft of Research (Wayne Booth). Film: Alien (Ridley Scott). Video: Dexter season 1

Class Number: 13563
Meeting time @ place:
TUTH 12:30pm - 2:00pm @ 54 Barrows Hall
Section Theme: Monsters and Modernity
Instructor: Jonathan Lang
Section Description:

Monsters used to represent fear of the unknown: unmapped regions in the medieval period were marked by dragons; imperialists in the 19th century bringing the "light" of civilization into the dark continent of Africa feared cannibals. Given the scientific basis of the modern period, would it not be accurate to say that we no longer believe in monsters, that they survive in the modern period if only so that they can serve as the very sign of an unenlightened, and superstitious past? No. Monsters have not been banished to the regions of superstition; they have not been relegated entirely to the past. Once we get over the fear that they might pop out from under our beds, we run to the cinema to delight in observing their contemporary manifestations: as mad scientists, bestial men and women, re-animated corpses, and cyborgs. In the modern period, monsters remain as figures not simply of fear and fascination but of real use. Monsters persist as an emblem of anxiety about a past that is too rapidly disintegrating so as to compromise the very structures of society; or alternatively as a mode of protest against the modernity of the modern period with its new forms of regulation and social control; or then again as the sign of a compromised future wherein the representation of the monster serves to question the "progress of progress," and direct suspicion onto the modern projects of science, industry, and technology. Two analytical papers; one  research paper.

Book List:

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (Robert Louis Stevenson), Dracula (Bram Stoker), Beloved (Toni Morrison), Craft of Research (Wayne Booth). Film: Alien (Ridley Scott). Video: Dexter season 1

Class Number: 13547
Meeting time @ place:
TUTH 2:00pm - 3:30pm @ 54 Barrows Hall
Section Theme: Inequity and Change: Class, Culture, and Health Care
Instructor: Margi Wald
Section Description:

Through a combination of small-class discussion, in-class workshops, as well as online forums, students will

  • craft essays that analyze and apply information from course texts;
  • gather primary and secondary outside sources on a topic related to our course theme;
  • create a research portfolio including an annotated bibliography, short reports, research notes, a project proposal, and a final paper.

This class explores crucial questions about health care, medicine, and social inequality in the U.S. Students will research (a) cultural differences in the experiences of illness and practices of healthcare and (b) biases and disparities in access created by social, political, and economic forces.  Students will also conduct their own fieldwork, examining in-depth local agencies that work toward lessening disparities and thus toward social change. The final project will ask students to view a particular issue of their choice through the theoretical lenses provided by course texts -- and perhaps makes recommendations for addressing it.

Book List:

TENTATIVE -- Do not purchase in advance:

Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies (Seth Holmes)

The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down (Anne Fadiman)

The Craft of Research (Wayne Booth et al.)

Online course reader

Class Number: 13548
Meeting time @ place:
TUTH 3:30pm - 5:00pm @ 183 Dwinelle Hall
Section Theme: Language and Identity
Section Description:

This semester we will exam issues related to language acquisition and multilingualism in general and then focus specifically on the “Language Gap” concept and its ramifications.  We are all speakers of varieties of English as well as other languages; we will read, research, and write about how these experiences have influenced and shaped our identities.

 

Book List:

 

Bacon, Nora. The Well-Crafted Sentence (A Writer’s Guide to Style) 2nd edition.(978-1457606731)

Booth et al. The Craft of Research (4th edition. (978-0-226023973-6)

DasBender, Gita. Language: a reader for writers. (978-0-19-994748-5)

Class Number: 44929
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 8:00am - 9:00am @ 54 Barrows Hall
Section Theme: Success Across the Curriculum: How Practitioners "Do" Their Discipline
Instructor: Caroline M. Cole
Section Description:

Meeting the expectations of faculty members trained in different disciplines can be daunting for students who are unaware of or unfamiliar with the range of values, assumptions, and protocols represented at the university. Nevertheless, knowing how to approach, engage with, and emulate context-specific discourse conventions can mean the difference between success and failure at the university, and beyond.

This section of College Writing R4B explores what it means to read, write, and think in disciplines across campus so we can better understand how participants in a field—that is, the practitioners—“do” the discipline.

Book List:

Required

Most of the materials for class discussion is in a course reader (to be available at a local copy shop the first week of class), but we will also use:

• Locke, L.F.. Proposals That Work: A Guide for Planning Dissertations and Grant Proposals, 5th or 6th edition (if 5th edition, ISBN-10: 1412924235; if 6th edition, ISBN-10: 1452216851)

• Lipson, C.. Doing Honest Work in College: How to Prepare Citations, Avoid Plagiarism and Achieve Real Academic Success, 2nd Edition (ISBN 978-0226484778)

To Be Determined
In addition to the required texts, students will work with several books, to varying degrees. We'll discuss when and how the following materials will come into play, so students should wait until after our first class meeting before purchasing any of these items.

• Abu-Lughod, L.. Do Muslim Women Need Saving? (ISBN-10: 0674088263)

• Doudna, J. A.. A Crack in Creation: Gene Editing and the Unthinkable Power to Control Evolution (ISBN-10: 0544716949)

• Elkins, J.. The Object Stares Back: On the Nature of Seeing (ISBN-10: 0156004976)

• James, A.. Assholes: A Theory (ISBN-10: 0804171351)

• Muller, R.A.. Physics for Future Presidents: The Science Behind the Headlines, excerpts (ISBN-10: 0393337111)

• Reich, R.B.. Saving Capitalism: For the Many, Not the Few (ISBN-10: 0345806220)

Pages