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CW R4B - Reading, Composition, and Research

Spring 2017
Description 

This writing seminar satisfies the second half (Part B) of the Reading & Composition Requirement. It offers students structured, sustained, and highly articulated practice in the recursive processes entailed in reading and composing, as well as critical analysis. The seminar affords students guided practice through the stages involved in creating a research paper. Students read five thematically related book-length texts, or the equivalent, drawn from a range of genres, in addition to various non-print sources. In response to these materials, students craft several short pieces leading up to two longer essays—works of exposition and/or argumentation. Students also draft a research paper, developing a research question, gathering, evaluating, and synthesizing information from texts and other sources. Elements of the research process, such as proposals, annotated bibliographies, an abstracts, "works cited" lists, and the like, are submitted, along with the final report, in a research portfolio. Students write a minimum of 32 pages of expository prose during the semester.

Note: Specialized sections are available for multilingual student writers.  These sections are marked (MSW) below.

Available in 
Fall and Spring
Prerequisites 
Satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement and the first half (Part A) of the Reading & Composition Requirement
Units and Format 
4 units – Three hours of seminar/discussion per week
Grading Option 
Must be taken for a letter grade for R&C credit
Fulfills 
Reading & Composition: 2nd half (Part B)

Section

Theme

Time

Instructor

Class Number: 13874
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 10:00am - 11:00am @ 54 Barrows Hall
Section Theme: Modern Love, Ancient Brains
Instructor: David Wiese
Section Description:

Evolutionary psychology reveals that most of us approach our quest for love with the mindset of a prehistoric cave dweller. And yet, while our base desires have not changed over the millennia, the manner in which we go about mating and dating has. In this course, you will explore the impact of economic and technological development on sexual impulses that evolved over millions of years of evolution. You will answer questions such as: How and why have conceptions of an ideal mate changed over time – and how have they not? How do gender interactions in today’s digital gold rush relate to those of the 1849 Gold Rush? How are smart phone apps and social media transforming romantic relationships? As you explore these questions, you will develop skills and strategies for effective reading, writing and research at Berkeley.

Book List:

a. They Saw the Elephant: Women in the California Gold Rush (JoAnn Levy)

b. Why Beautiful People Have More Daughters: From Dating, Shopping, and Praying to Going to War and Becoming a Billionaire (Alan Miller, Satoshi Kanazawa)

c. Virtual Love (Kim Malone Scott) 

d. Modern Love (Aziz Ansari, Eric Klinenberg)

Class Number: 13875
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 11:00am - 12:00pm @ 2011 Valley LSB
Section Theme: Monsters and Modernity
Instructor: Jonathan Lang
Section Description:

Monsters used to represent fear of the unknown: unmapped regions in the medieval period were marked by dragons; imperialists in the 19th century bringing the "light" of civilization into the dark continent of Africa feared cannibals. Given the scientific basis of the modern period, would it not be accurate to say that we no longer believe in monsters, that they survive in the modern period so that they can serve as the very sign of an unenlightened, and superstitious past? No. Monsters have not been banished to the regions of superstition; they have not been relegated entirely to the past. Once we get over the fear that they might pop out from under our beds, we run to the cinema to delight in observing their contemporary manifestations: as mad scientists, bestial humans, re-animated corpses, and cyborgs. In the modern period, monsters remain as figures not simply of fear and fascination but of real use. Monsters persist as an emblem of anxiety about a past that is too rapidly disintegrating so as to compromise the very structures of society; or alternatively as a mode of protest against the modernity of the modern period with its new forms of regulation and social control; or as the sign of a compromised future wherein the representation of the monster serves to question the "progress of progress," and direct suspicion onto the modern projects of science, industry, and technology. In addition to 2 short analytical papers (5-8 pp.); 1 long research paper.

Book List:

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (Robert Louis Stevenson), Dracula (Bram Stoker), Beloved (Toni Morrison), Craft of Research (Wayne Booth). Film: Alien (Ridley Scott). Video: Dexter season 1; additional short readings.

Class Number: 13876
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 12:00pm - 1:00pm @ 2032 Valley LSB
Section Theme: The High Stakes in Sports Culture
Instructor: Chisako Cole
Section Description:

Don’t worry, you don’t necessarily have to be athletic to take this class- you don’t even have to like sports (although you can)! Sports is based on ability and talent, but it can deviate, influenced by various social structures. In this course, we’ll explore this divergence in the culture of sports and its relationship with education, media, gentrification, body and fandom. Key questions guiding the course include: what is the role of sports in educational institutions? How is the culture of sports disneyified and commercialized? How does the sports culture influence our body image and how do fans impact the culture? 

 

 

Book List:

Bissinger, H.G. Friday Night Lights

Washington, R.E. & Karen, D. Sport, Power, and Society: Institutions and Practices

Booth, Colomb, & Williams. The Craft of Research

Class Number: 13877
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 1:00pm - 2:00pm @ 238 Kroeber Hall
Section Theme: Modern Love, Ancient Brains
Instructor: David Wiese
Section Description:

Evolutionary psychology reveals that most of us approach our quest for love with the mindset of a prehistoric cave dweller. And yet, while our base desires have not changed over the millennia, the manner in which we go about mating and dating has. In this course, you will explore the impact of economic and technological development on sexual impulses that evolved over millions of years of evolution. You will answer questions such as: How and why have conceptions of an ideal mate changed over time – and how have they not? How do gender interactions in today’s digital gold rush relate to those of the 1849 Gold Rush? How are smart phone apps and social media transforming romantic relationships? As you explore these questions, you will develop skills and strategies for effective reading, writing and research at Berkeley.

Book List:

a. They Saw the Elephant: Women in the California Gold Rush (JoAnn Levy)

b. Why Beautiful People Have More Daughters: From Dating, Shopping, and Praying to Going to War and Becoming a Billionaire (Alan Miller, Satoshi Kanazawa)

c. Virtual Love (Kim Malone Scott) 

d. Modern Love (Aziz Ansari, Eric Klinenberg)

Class Number: 13878
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 2:00pm - 3:00pm @ 246 Dwinelle Hall
Section Theme: Golden Myths: California Then and Now
Instructor: Ben Spanbock
Section Description:

This course serves as an introduction to research and research based writing by inviting students to look back through California’s eclectic histories and make connections to some of the contemporary issues they have spawned. In doing so, the primary objective will be to examine how writers and researchers have made sense of California’s history and current events, and begin to apply some of these techniques through acts of research and writing. This course is predicated on the idea that our job as scholars is to explore, understand, and form opinions on difficult problems, and that California’s diverse social, cultural, environmental, economic, and regional landscapes stand to benefit from intellectually informed ideas moving into the future. Beginning with an overview of established theory related to the study of California as both a place and a concept, we will work together to define limited fields of study. Students will then identify and pursue issues relevant to interests in these fields.

Book List:

Course Reader (available online)

The Craft of Research, 3rd edition (Booth, Wayne C.)

The Silicon Valley of Dreams (Pellow, David N. and Sun-Hee Park, Lisa.) 

Class Number: 13879
Meeting time @ place:
MWF 3:00pm - 4:00pm @ 251 Dwinelle Hall
Section Theme: Present-Day Native American Peoples & Nations
Instructor: Michelle Baptiste
Section Description:

This course examines and then moves beyond stereotypes to take a multi-disciplinary, multi-media approach towards researching and understanding present day Native peoples of the Americas.  Students explore divergent perspectives as they develop their voice as writers and researchers--choosing among a diverse array of topics to investigate in light of Native American activism: from education, gender, literature, politics, and histories to medical practices, religions, economies, businesses, and languages. 

 

 

 

 

Book List:

Alexie, S. (2003).  Ten little Indians.  New York: Grove Press.  ISBN 978-0802141170

Bigelow, B. & Petersen, B., Eds.  (2003).  Rethinking Columbus: The Next 500 Years.  Milwaukee: Rethinking Schools.  ISBN 978- 0942961201

Bishop, W., & Zemliansky, P, Eds.  (2001).  The Subject Is Research: Processes and Practices.  Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook Publishers.  ISBN 0867095725 

Streamed films: The Searchers, Smoke Signals, Coming to Light: Edward S. Curtis & the North American Indians, Frozen River, & Incident at Oglala

Class Number: 13882
Meeting time @ place:
TUTH 9:30am - 11:00am @ 206 Dwinelle Hall
Section Theme: The Machine Starts: Technology and its (Dis)contents
Instructor: Michael Larkin
Section Description:

Many of us spend hours upon hours every day at our computers and smart phones connecting to the world and to each other through the rapidly proliferating "apps" of technology, from the "old school" Web 1.0 of email to the ever-evolving world of social networking. What does the increased use of these tools mean for the ways we communicate with one another, the ways we read and write and learn, the ways we define what it means to be an individual, what it means to be human? In this course, you will engage with texts that consider these and other related questions; you will work on reading and writing skills by writing a series of essays about those texts (and those questions); and you'll learn the rudiments of academic research as you craft a research project centered on a subject of your own choosing that fits within our course theme. And who knows—maybe we'll answer some of those questions too.

Book List:

"The Machine Stops" (E.M. Forster); You Are Not a Gadget (Jaron Lanier); Deep Lab (deeplab.net), The Craft of Research third edition (Booth, Colomb, and Williams), Course Reader. Short Film: Deep Lab (documentary)

Class Number: 13883
Meeting time @ place:
TUTH 12:30pm - 2:00pm @ 206 Dwinelle Hall
Section Theme: Music and Social Movements
Instructor: Kaya Oakes
Section Description:

Music and social movements have always gone hand in hand. From the days of the fight for worker's rights, to the civil rights movement, through today's regurgence of feminism, Black Lives Matter, and the movement for LGBTQ equality, social change has always had a soundtrack. In this section of CWR4B, we'll explore the connections between social movements and music, incorporating persuasive and analytical writing as well as research. You'll write on a variety of topics, learn to use Berkeley's libraries to support your writing, study writers who use research in their own work, and engage in lively discussions. 

Book List:

Rebecca Solnit, Men Explain Things To Me; Jeff Chang, Can't Stop Won't Stop; John Seabrook, The Song Machine; Booth, Colomb and Williams, The Craft of Research

Class Number: 13884
Meeting time @ place:
TUTH 2:00pm - 3:30pm @ 206 Dwinelle Hall
Section Theme: TBA
Instructor: Pat Steenland
Section Description:
Book List:
Class Number: 13885
Meeting time @ place:
TUTH 3:30pm - 5:00pm @ 174 Barrows Hall
Section Theme: Language and Identity
Section Description:

This semester we will exam issues related to language acquisition and multilingualism in general and then focus specifically on the “Language Gap” concept and its ramifications.  We are all speakers of varieties of English as well as other languages; we will read, research, and write about how these experiences have influenced and shaped our identities.

Book List:

Bacon, Nora. The Well-Crafted Sentence (A Writer’s Guide to Style) 2nd edition.(978-1457606731)

Chodorow, Stanley. Writing a Successful Research Paper: a simple approach. (978-1603844406)

DasBender, Gita. Language: a reader for writers. (978-0-19-994748-5)

 

Pages