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CW R1A - Accelerated Reading and Composition

Fall 2017
Description 

This intensive, accelerated course satisfies concurrently the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement and the first half (Part A) of the Reading & Composition Requirement. It offers students structured, sustained, and highly articulated practice in the recursive processes entailed in reading, critical analysis, and composing. Readings include imaginative, expository, and argumentative texts comparable in complexity to those encountered in the lower-division curriculum. Texts are chosen to represent views and perspectives of authors from diverse social and cultural backgrounds. Students read five thematically related book-length texts, or the equivalent, drawn from a range of genres, in addition to non-print sources. In response to these materials, they craft numerous short pieces leading up to three to five essays—works that include elements of narration, exposition, and argument. Students write a minimum of 40 pages of prose during this semester and they compose an annotated portfolio that showcases their best work.

Note: Specialized sections are available for multilingual student writers. These sections are marked (MSW) below.

Available in 
Fall and Spring
Prerequisites 
Placement by the Analytical Writing Placement Examination
Units and Format 
6 units – Six hours of lecture/discussion per week
Grading Option 
Must be taken for a letter grade for R&C credit
Fulfills 
Reading & Composition: 1st half (Part A)

Section

Theme

Time

Instructor

Class Number: 13483
Meeting time @ place:
TUTH 9:00am - 12:00pm @ L20 Unit 1 Central
Section Theme: TBA
Instructor: Pat Steenland
Section Description:
Book List:
Class Number: 13484
Meeting time @ place:
TUTH 9:00am - 12:00pm @ L9 Unit 2 Wada
Section Theme: Happy Happy, Joy Joy
Instructor: Carolyn Hill
Section Description:

Tired of gloom and doom, stress and misery? Let's get happy! We'll explore current psychological research about happiness (centered right here at Cal, believe it or not), engage in activities that make us happy, read happy texts, think happy thoughts, and (yes) write happy papers. From belly laughs to blessings, we'll take the happy road to learning.

frog

Book List:

The Secret Garden (Frances Hodgson Burnett); The How of Happiness: A New Approach to Getting the Life You Want (Sonja Lyubomirsky); The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (Douglas Adams); The Book of the Unnamed Midwife (Meg Elison); Easy Writer: A Pocket Guide (Andrea Lunsford); Style: The Basics of Clarity and Grace (Joseph Williams); Course Reader (online)

Class Number: 13485
Meeting time @ place:
TUTH 9:00am - 12:00pm @ L20 Unit 2 Central
Section Theme: The Capacious Identity
Instructor: Chisako Cole
Section Description:

How do we define identity? How do we form our identity and what affects it? In this class, we’ll explore how we see ourselves and how others perceive us based on space, stereotypes, expectations and language. Key concepts we’ll focus on are public places vs. private spaces, authenticity and commercialization, gentrification, and language acquisition. Students will examine a variety of texts- writing assignments will include a film analysis, persuasive essay and a multimodal blog essay.

Book List:

Space & Place (Tuan)
The Search for General Tso (Cheney)
In Other Words (Lahiri)
How to Kill a City (Moskowitz)
Course Reader 

Class Number: 13486
Meeting time @ place:
TUTH 9:00am - 12:00pm @ L12 Unit 1 Slottman
Section Theme: Money & Morality
Instructor: David Wiese
Section Description:

In this course, you will hone your reading, writing, and critical thinking skills by exploring the intersection between economics and morality. Freakonomics authors Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner explain the terms thusly: "If morality represents how we would like the world to work, economics represents how it actually does work". You will develop techniques for effectively reading and writing a variety of texts as you answer questions such as: Is the news a public service or a commercial product? Is piracy a good thing? Do movies with sex and violence make more money at the box office? What happens to the moral message of America's most infamous liberal protest novel when a politically conservative studio adapts it to a film? How does your name affect your prospects in life? Why don't more people use environmentally friendly vehicles? and more. The course includes readings from a variety of authors of diverse backgrounds. You will write at least 40 pages of polished prose, divided among 4-6 essays. 

Book List:
Class Number: 13487
Meeting time @ place:
TUTH 12:00pm - 3:00pm @ L20 Unit 2 Central
Section Theme: The Capacious Identity
Instructor: Chisako Cole
Section Description:

How do we define identity? How do we form our identity and what affects it? In this class, we’ll explore how we see ourselves and how others perceive us based on space, stereotypes, expectations and language. Key concepts we’ll focus on are public places vs. private spaces, authenticity and commercialization, gentrification, and language acquisition. Students will examine a variety of texts- writing assignments will include a film analysis, persuasive essay and a multimodal blog essay.

Book List:

Space & Place (Tuan)
The Search for General Tso (Cheney)
In Other Words (Lahiri)
How to Kill a City (Moskowitz)
Course Reader 

Class Number: 13488
Meeting time @ place:
TUTH 12:00pm - 3:00pm @ L11 Unit 2 Towle
Section Theme: ‘Magnificent Diversity’: Eco-Thinking in the Age of Climate Change
Instructor: Teri Crisp
Section Description:

A hallmark of humanity is our extraordinary creativity, born and nurtured within the natural world. Yet human industry and development have resulted in the alarming loss of nature, accelerating in the last 150 years, along with climate change. What obligations do we have to other species, ecosystems, each other, and coming generations? How can wild nature be conserved or restored? What can industrialized peoples learn from traditional cultures? What can we learn from ‘eco-thinkers,’ past and present, whose vision has transcended the narrow confines of human-centered striving and conflict to embrace earth’s wonders? These are some of the questions we will pursue through reading a variety of writers (scientists, social thinkers, journalists, poets, activists, and others) and through films and art. And you will have the opportunity to develop your perspectives through writing and lively discussion. 

Book List:

(May change; please do not purchase in advance) The Writer’s Diet: A Guide to Fit Prose (Helen Sword), A Modest Genius (Hanne Strager), Sharing the Earth (Elizabeth Ammons), Course Reader.  

Class Number: 13489
Meeting time @ place:
TUTH 12:00pm - 3:00pm @ L13 Unit 1 Christian
Section Theme: TBA
Instructor: Pat Steenland
Section Description:
Book List:
Class Number: 28327
Meeting time @ place:
TUTH 12:00pm - 3:00pm @ L12 Unit 1 Slottman
Section Theme: Money & Morality
Instructor: David Wiese
Section Description:

In this course, you will hone your reading, writing, and critical thinking skills by exploring the intersection between economics and morality. Freakonomics authors Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner explain the terms thusly: "If morality represents how we would like the world to work, economics represents how it actually does work". You will develop techniques for effectively reading and writing a variety of texts as you answer questions such as: Is the news a public service or a commercial product? Is piracy a good thing? Do movies with sex and violence make more money at the box office? What happens to the moral message of America's most infamous liberal protest novel when a politically conservative studio adapts it to a film? How does your name affect your prospects in life? Why don't more people use environmentally friendly vehicles? and more. The course includes readings from a variety of authors of diverse backgrounds. You will write at least 40 pages of polished prose, divided among 4-6 essays. 

Book List:
Class Number: 44760
Meeting time @ place:
MW 9:00am - 12:00pm @ L20 Unit 1 Central
Section Theme: TBA
Instructor: Aparajita Nanda
Section Description:
Book List:
Class Number: 21859
Meeting time @ place:
MW 12:00pm - 3:00pm @ L20 Unit 1 Central
Section Theme: Madness in Culture
Instructor: Scott Wallin
Section Description:

Psychiatry tells us that madness is “mental illness.” We may welcome this point of view when we are desperate to avoid suffering. But what are some of the other stories we tell? For example, what happens when we disagree whether someone is sick or not? Or when we explain the cause of madness in competing ways? Furthermore, not all madness is bad. Aristotle observes that “no excellent soul is exempt from a mixture of madness,” and some artistic work, such as Sarah Kane’s 4.48 Psychosis, demonstrates its fecundity with stark beauty. Madness may entice us with its mystery, individuality, insight, or power. When we look at madness in culture, we see that it is not a simple, stable, objective medical condition but rather also a fluid social construction borne out of the stories we tell, the images we make, and the values we ascribe. Through your critical reading and writing about visual art, literature, films, theater, medicine, the law, and the news media, you will join these larger conversations and share your own responses, questions, and ideas on what it means to be mad and how we might think and feel about it.

Book List:

Course Reader

Graff, Gerald & Cathy Birkenstein. "They Say/ I Say": The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing, 2nd or 3rd edition (ISBN: 978-0-393-93584-4)

Kane, Sarah. 4.48 Psychosis (ISBN: 0413748308)

Kesey, Ken. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (ISBN: 978-0-143-12951-6)

Penhall, Joe. Blue/Orange (ISBN: 1408140918)

Pages